La présentation est en train de télécharger. S'il vous plaît, attendez

La présentation est en train de télécharger. S'il vous plaît, attendez

Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Le cytosquelette

Présentations similaires


Présentation au sujet: "Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Le cytosquelette"— Transcription de la présentation:

1 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Le cytosquelette I - Les principes communs aux trois types de filaments, assemblage, désassemblage II - Régulation des filaments du cytosquelette III - Les moteurs moléculaires IV - Fonctions du cytosquelette dans la cellule

2 II - Régulation des filaments du cytosquelette
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 II - Régulation des filaments du cytosquelette

3 Dynamisme des éléments du cytosquelette
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Dynamisme des éléments du cytosquelette Régulation des filaments en longueur, stabilité, nombre et géométrie Interagissent les uns avec les autres et avec les autres composants de la cellule Parfois liaisons covalentes de protéines accessoires Soit avec les sous-unités Soit avec le filament p929

4 Plan Nucléation Protéines de liaison  dynamisme du cytosquelette
Organisation d'ordre supérieur Fixation des éléments du cytosquelette à la membrane plasmique

5 A – Nucléation Nucléation des microtubules
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 A – Nucléation Nucléation des microtubules -tubuline Centrosome Autres cas Nucléation des microfilaments p929

6 1 - Nucléation des microtubules
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 1 - Nucléation des microtubules Centre Organisateur des MicroTubules (COMT) = site de nucléation des microtubules dans la cellule -tubuline = nucléation des microtubules De la levure à l'homme Présente dans tous les COMT -tubuline ring complex (-TuRC) = COMT très puissant #1p930

7 a) - Nucléation des microtubules par la -tubuline
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 a) - Nucléation des microtubules par la -tubuline Nucléation à l’extrémité moins Allongement par l’extrémité plus Intervention de deux protéines qui se fixent directement à la -tubuline #1p930

8 Fig16-22 Nucléation d'un microtubule par -TuRC
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Nucléation d'un microtubule par -TuRC Présence des deux protéines plus des protéines accessoires pour aider à la création de l’anneau -tubuline ring complexes en microscopie électronique MT nucléés à partir de -tubuline ring complexes purifiés Fig16-22

9 Moritz,M2001(fig1) Modèles de nucléation des microtubules
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Modèles de nucléation des microtubules Moritz,M2001(fig1) Fig. 1. Models of microtubule nucleation. (a) A microtubule nucleated spontaneously from pure /-tubulin. The microtubule is polar:  -tubulin is minus-end proximal and  -tubulin is plus-end proximal. Note the three-start helix and the `seam'. (b) The “template” model predicts that the -tubulins of the TuRC interact with each other laterally and contact -tubulins longitudinally at the minus end of the microtubule. This results in the stabilization of a small number of tubulin subunits, so that elongation is favored. The TuRC determines the number of protofilaments in the microtubule. (c) The `protofilament' model proposes that the -tubulins in the TuRC interact with each other longitudinally and with /-tubulins primarily laterally. The TuRC unwinds to form the first protofilament of the microtubule, promoting formation of a small sheet that then grows into a microtubule. Microtubule nucléé spontanément à partir de tubuline / pure Modèle avec matrice Modèle protofilament

10 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Structure de -tubuline ring complexes isolés de drosophile Moritz,M2001(fig2) Fig. 2. Structure of isolated Drosophila TuRCs. (a–d) Selected views of a reconstructed TuRC obtained by electron microscopic tomography. In each image, several sections from the reconstruction were stacked into a single volume. (a) View of the TuRC face containing the asymmetric `cap'. (b) Middle section of the TuRC. Note the ring wall subunits and that the cap does not extend very far into the ring lumen; a cap remnant can be seen spanning the ring lumen. (c) Side view of the TuRC. Note the inverted V-shaped ring wall subunits and the cap structure. The blue-dashed line outlines one paired subunit, which is proposed to be one TuSC. (d) Alternative side view of the TuRC. Bar = 10 nm. (e) Platinum replicas of TuRCs. The helical structure and ring wall subunits are apparent in the upper three and lower left panels. The lower right and middle panels show the ring face topped by the asymmetric cap. Bar = 10 nm. (f) Platinum replicas of pure bovine-brain /-tubulin. Note that the structures of the tubulin polymers are distinct from those of TuRCs (compare with Fig. 2e). (g) Model of the helical TuRC structure, showing the ring opening (left) and the opposite side (middle). The model incorporates features of the reconstructions and of the platinum replicas. Ring walls are proposed to consist of repeating TuSC subunits (outlined in blue), each comprising two -tubulins (pink) and one copy each of Dgrips 84 and 91 (green). Dgrips 163, 128 and 75s (gray) are proposed to make up the cap. The right panel shows a tilted view of the image shown in (c), showing the TuRC as it might be expected to appear in the absence of helix flattening caused by binding to the grid. Reproduced from [24??] with permission. Dgrip Drosophila gamma ring protein γTuRC γ-tubulin ring complex γTuSC γ-tubulin small complex Dgrip Drosophila gamma ring protein

11 New models of microtubule nucleation by the -TuRC or monomeric -tubulin
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Fig. 4. New models of microtubule nucleation by the TuRC or monomeric -tubulin. (a–c) Possible template mechanisms for nucleation. (a) A model to accommodate a TuRC containing 14 -tubulins (based on models presented in [22 and 23]). An overlap of one half of a TuSC on each end of the helix would maintain 13-fold symmetry. The -tubulins would all contact -tubulin longitudinally. (b) A `split-helix' model [22] that would accommodate 14 -tubulins in the TuRC and allow a direct interaction between - tubulin and -tubulin. The `seam' side of the microtubule contains an overlap of two - tubulins (left), with the D/Xgrip subunit perhaps folding inward to allow the interaction. The TuRC helix on the nonseam side of the microtubule (right) would also be split to allow an interaction between -tubulin and -tubulin. (c) A model to accommodate a 12 -tubulin-containing TuRC (reproduced with permission from [24]). The D/Xgrip subunits are proposed to hold the -tubulins in a helix with 13-fold symmetry, with the thirteenth point of symmetry created by a gap in the ring. The thirteenth protofilament might form through stabilizing lateral interactions with the twelfth and first protofilaments. (d) A model of how a single -tubulin might nucleate and cap a microtubule (based on [25]). The single, strong interaction between -tubulin and -tubulin is proposed to stabilize the initial few tubulin subunits in the polymer, facilitating subsequent elongation. A possible nucleus is outlined in green. The `X's indicate that further addition of subunits cannot occur in these two directions, explaining the minus-end capping activity of the -tubulin. (e) An example of how binding of the D/Xgrip proteins of the TuSC (or Spc97/Spc98 of the yeast Tub4 complex) might shield -tubulin-binding sites on -tubulin. Moritz,M2001(fig4) TuSC : -tubulin small complex Dgrip : Drosophila gamma ring protein

12 b) - Le centrosome : principal centre organisateur des microtubules
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 b) - Le centrosome : principal centre organisateur des microtubules Situé près du noyau Émanation des microtubules en étoile à partir du centrosome Extrémité - des MT dans le centrosome Extrémité + des MT en périphérie Contient plus de 50 copies de -TuRC dans sa matrice Contient une paire de centrioles #2p930

13 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Le centrosome Fig16-23 #2p930

14 Les centrioles id corpuscules basaux des cils et des flagelles
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Les centrioles id corpuscules basaux des cils et des flagelles Matériel péricentriolaire = matrice centrosomale Duplication des centrioles suivie de la duplication des centrosomes cf. mitose #2p931

15 Structure des centrioles
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Structure des centrioles Cylindre de microtubules + protéines accessoires #2p931

16 Fig16-24 Un centriole dans un centrosome Matrice centrosomale fibreuse
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Un centriole dans un centrosome Matrice centrosomale fibreuse Fig16-24 #2p931

17 c) - Cas particuliers de COMT
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 c) - Cas particuliers de COMT Champignons et diatomés pas de centriole plaques incluses dans l'enveloppe nucléaire : corps du pôle du fuseau Plantes supérieures COMT répartis tout autour de l'enveloppe nucléaire Présence de -tubuline dans tous les cas #2p931

18 Orientation des microtubules
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Orientation des microtubules Configuration en étoile des microtubules Extrémité plus tournée vers l’extérieur de la cellule Extrémité moins tournée vers le noyau Dispositif de surveillance de la périphérie de l’intérieur de la cellule et de la position centrale du centrosome conservé même in vitro…

19 Positionnement du centrosome au centre de la cellule
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Positionnement du centrosome au centre de la cellule Fig16-25 #2p931 Centrosome isolé + tubuline dans une chambre artificielle en plastique (image toutes les 3 minutes)

20 Positionnement des COMTs dans des micro-chambres
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Positionnement des COMTs dans des micro-chambres Positioning of MTOCs in microfabricated chambers. (a) Three differential interference contrast images of a centrosome in a square chamber. The chamber is 4 μm deep and the tubulin concentration is 3.2 mg/ml. Images are 3 min apart. The slope of the well dominates the signal close to the edges of the chamber. (b) Three fluorescence images of an AMTOC in a square chamber. The chamber is 6 μm deep and the tubulin concentration is 1.4 mg/ml. Time is indicated in each frame. (c) An aster regrown from an AMTOC in 2.3 mg/ml tubulin, stabilized by diluting with 30% (vol/vol) glycerol/BRB80, spun down through a cushion of 40% glycerol/BRB80 onto a coverslip coated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, and fixed with glutaraldehyde. Image taken by confocal fluorescence microscopy. (d) Two centrosomes in a square chamber. (All bars are 10 μm.) Holy,TE1997 Positioning of MTOCs in microfabricated chambers. (a) Three differential interference contrast images of a centrosome in a square chamber. The chamber is 4 μm deep and the tubulin concentration is 3.2 mg/ml. Images are 3 min apart. The slope of the well dominates the signal close to the edges of the chamber. (b) Three fluorescence images of an AMTOC in a square chamber. The chamber is 6 μm deep and the tubulin concentration is 1.4 mg/ml. Time is indicated in each frame. (c) An aster regrown from an AMTOC in 2.3 mg/ml tubulin, stabilized by diluting with 30% (vol/vol) glycerol/BRB80, spun down through a cushion of 40% glycerol/BRB80 onto a coverslip coated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, and fixed with glutaraldehyde. Image taken by confocal fluorescence microscopy. (d) Two centrosomes in a square chamber. (All bars are 10 μm.)

21 Mélanophore de poisson
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Mélanophore de poisson Fig16-26 #2p931

22 MT = point de repère dans la cellule
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 MT = point de repère dans la cellule Permet de retrouver le centre de la cellule Permet de disposer les organites dans les cytosol Propriété intrinsèque des microtubules #2p931

23 2 - Nucléation des microfilaments (d'actine)
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 2 - Nucléation des microfilaments (d'actine) (Nucléation des MT : près du noyau) Nucléation des microfilaments : sur la membrane plasmique  accumulation de microfilaments en périphérie  définit le cortex cellulaire Cortex cellulaire Couche de filaments d’actine accumulés sous la membrane plasmique Détermine la forme et le mouvement de la surface cellulaire  forme 1-D : microvillosités, spicules, filopodes 2-D : lamellipodes #3p931

24 Fig16-27 Anciens filaments existant avant la perméabilisation
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Anciens filaments existant avant la perméabilisation Nouveaux filaments formés sur le bord avant: site de nucléation des filaments Fig16-27 5 m #3p931 Bord avant d’un fibroblaste : nucléation des MF Incubation avec actine-rhodamine visualisant les nouveaux filaments d’actine

25 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Control of actin polymerization in live and permeabilized fibroblasts MH Symons and TJ Mitchison J. Cell Biol : Figure 2. Localization of rhodamine-actin incorporation in fibroblasts fixed shortly after injection. (a-c) shows a detail of a cell simultaneously permeabilized and fixed 24 s after injection. (a) Rhodamine stain, showing newly incorporated actin. The arrows outline the section corresponding to the profiles in (d). (b) Fluorescein- phalloidin stain, showing both preexisting and newly incorporated filaments; (c) rhodamine/fluorescein ratio image, the arrowheads delineate the lamellipodium, and correspond to the fat arrows marked in the intensity profiles . The appearance of the stress fibers in the ratio image (c) as yellow over a red background, while they are not visible in the rhodamine image (a) itself, is caused by the higher background in the perinuclear part of the rhodamine image, which is divided by the stress fibers in the corresponding area of the fluorescein image (b) . (d) Not shown Normalized intensity profiles from the respective channels along the lines delineated by arrows in a. ( - ) Fluorescein profile; ( ) rhodamine profile. The fat arrows in ddelineate the lamellipodium, the thin arrow indicates the front of the wave of incorporated actin. See Materials and Methods for further details. The color scale from green to purple corresponds to low and high rhodamine/fluorescein ratios, respectively. Bars, (b) 10 /,m; (d) 2 .5 Am. Figure 4. Steady-state incorporationof injected actin, showing a detail of a cell fixed 20 min after injection. (a) Rhodamine stain, showing the incorporated actin. The arrows outline the section corresponding to the profiles in d. (b) Phalloidin stain . (c) Rhodamine/ fluorescein ratio image, arrowheads delineate the lamellipodium boundaries . (d) Not shown Normalized intensity profiles along the section marked in a. Full-line fluorescein profile and dashed line, rhodamine profile. Fat arrows delineate the lamellipodium. Bars : (b) 10 um; (d) 2.5 gym. Symons,MH1991p503 Control of actin polymerization in live and permeabilized fibroblasts MH Symons and TJ Mitchison J. Cell Biol : Figure 2. Localization of rhodamine-actin incorporation in fibroblasts fixed shortly after injection. (a-c) shows a detail of a cell simultaneously permeabilized and fixed 24 s after injection. (a) Rhodamine stain, showing newly incorporated actin. The arrows outline the section corresponding to the profiles in (d). (b) Fluorescein- phalloidin stain, showing both preexisting and newly incorporated filaments; (c) rhodamine/fluorescein ratio image, the arrowheads delineate the lamellipodium, and correspond to the fat arrows marked in the intensity profiles . The appearance of the stress fibers in the ratio image (c) as yellow over a red background, while they are not visible in the rhodamine image (a) itself, is caused by the higher background in the perinuclear part of the rhodamine image, which is divided by the stress fibers in the corresponding area of the fluorescein image (b) . (d) Normalized intensity profiles from the respective channels along the lines delineated by arrows in a. ( - ) Fluorescein profile; ( ) rhodamine profile. The fat arrows in ddelineate the lamellipodium, the thin arrow indicates the front of the wave of incorporated actin. See Materials and Methods for further details. The color scale from green to purple corresponds to low and high rhodamine/fluorescein ratios, respectively. Bars, (b) 10 /,m; (d) 2 .5 Am. Figure 4. Steady-state incorporationof injected actin, showing a detail of a cell fixed 20 min after injection. (a) Rhodamine stain, showing the incorporated actin. The arrows outline the section corresponding to the profiles in d. (b) Phalloidin stain . (c) Rhodamine/ fluorescein ratio image, arrowheads delineate the lamellipodium boundaries . (d) Normalized intensity profiles along the section marked in a. Full-line fluorescein profile and dashed line, rhodamine profile. Fat arrows delineate the lamellipodium. Bars : (b) 10 um; (d) 2.5 gym. Contrôle de la polymérisation de l’actine dans des fibroblastes vivants et perméabilisés

26 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Symons,MH1991p503 Control of actin polymerization in live and permeabilized fibroblasts MH Symons and TJ Mitchison J. Cell Biol : Figure 5.Rhodamine-actin incorporation in saponin-permeabilized cells. (a) rhodamine stain, showing exogenous actin incorporation ; (b) fluorescein-phalloidin stain, showing preexisting and newly incorporated filaments; (c) rhodamine/fluorescein ratio, arrowheads outline the lamellipodial boundary (d) not shown / intensity profiles along the arrows shown in a. For this experiment 0.4 t.M RA was added together with 0.2 mg/ml saponin in permeabilization buffer and incubated for 5 min before fixation. Bars : (b) 10 I,m; (d) 2.5 um. Control of actin polymerization in live and permeabilized fibroblasts MH Symons and TJ Mitchison J. Cell Biol : Figure 5.Rhodamine-actin incorporation in saponin-permeabilized cells. (a) rhodamine stain, showing exogenous actin incorporation ; (b) fluorescein-phalloidin stain, showing preexisting and newly incorporated filaments; (c) rhodamine/fluorescein ratio, arrowheads outline the lamellipodial boundary ; and (d) intensity profiles along the arrows shown in a. For this experiment 0.4 t.M RA was added together with 0.2 mg/ml saponin in permeabilization buffer and incubated for 5 min before fixation . Bars : (b) 10 I,m; (d) 2.5 um. Control de la polymérisation de l’actine dans des fibroblastes vivants et perméabilisés

27 Mécanisme de la nucléation
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Mécanisme de la nucléation Régulée par des signaux externes Catalysée par un complexe de protéines qui comprend deux Actine Related Proteins (ARPs)

28 Actin Related Proteins (ARPs)
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Actin Related Proteins (ARPs) Catalysent la nucléation de l'actine 2 protéines proche à 45% de l'actine Fonction analogue à -TuRC pour la tubuline Comprend le complexe ARP (= Arp 2/3) Nuclée le filament à partir de l’extrémité – Et allonge rapidement l’extrémité + Peut se fixer latéralement  embranchement #3p932

29 Rôle du complexe ARP dans la nucléation de l'actine
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Fig16-28(AB) #3p932

30 Rôle du complexe ARP dans la formation du réseau d'actine
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Rôle du complexe ARP dans la formation du réseau d'actine Fig16-28(C) #3p932

31 Microscopie électronique de complexes Arp2/3 en congélation sublimation et ombrage rotatoire (A) et de complexes mélangés avec des filaments d’actine cappés avec de la gelsoline (B-D). Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Electron micrographs of quick-frozen, deep-etched, and rotary-shadowed samples of Arp2/3 complex (A) and complex mixed with gelsolin-capped actin filaments (B-D). In the presence of Arp2/3, complex actin filaments form branching arbors with numerous end-to-side connections between filaments (B). The branch points appear to be rigid attachments with a fixed 70° angle between actin filaments (C) and frequently contain a globular mass at the point of attachment (C, left arrow in B). (D) Filaments partially decorated with Arp2/3 complex. (E) Globular masses associated with filament pointed ends in the presence of Arp2/3 complex. Conditions: buffer same as Fig. 1 Fig. 3. Electron micrographs of quick-frozen, deep- etched, and rotary-shadowed samples of Arp2/3 complex (A) and complex mixed with gelsolin- capped actin filaments (B-D). In the presence of Arp2/3, complex actin filaments form branching arbors with numerous end-to-side connections between filaments (B). The branch points appear to be rigid attachments with a fixed 70° angle between actin filaments (C) and frequently contain a globular mass at the point of attachment (C, left arrow in B). (D) Filaments partially decorated with Arp2/3 complex. (E) Globular masses associated with filament pointed ends in the presence of Arp2/3 complex. Conditions: buffer same as Fig. 1 Mullins,RD1998

32 Données évolutives -tubuline et ARP
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Données évolutives -tubuline et ARP Très anciens Très conservés Duplication du gène codant pour tubuline ou actine avec une fonction de nucléation en plus par divergence et spécialisation #3p932

33 B – Protéines de liaison  dynamisme du cytosquelette
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Protéines de liaison aux sous-unités libres Actine Thymosine Profiline Tubuline Stathmine Protéines de liaison latérale MAPs Tropomyosine Cofiline Protéines de liaison aux extrémités #4p932

34 1 - Protéines de liaison aux sous-unités libres
Actine Tubuline

35 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 a) Actine Dans une cellule (non musculaire) : 50% actine filamenteuse / 50% actine soluble [Actine] en monomère dans une cellule : M (2-8 mg/ml) Cc [Actine] en monomère en tube à essai : <1 M  Pourquoi l’actine soluble ne polymérise-t-elle pas en filaments dans la cellule ? Parce qu’il y a des protéines qui empêchent la polymérisation en se fixant sur les sous-unités #4p932

36 Protéines de liaison aux sous-unités libres d’actine
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Protéines de liaison aux sous-unités libres d’actine Thymosine : la plus abondante Profiline Ne peuvent être fixées en même temps #4p932

37 Thymosine Bloque l'actine libre 
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Thymosine Bloque l'actine libre  Qui ne peut s’associer ni au bout + ni au bout - Bloque l'échange et/ou l'hydrolyse de ATP Empêche l'allongement Comment utiliser cette actine séquestrée ? Système de régulation de la thymosine ? non Intervention de la profiline ? oui #4p932

38 Profiline Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Se fixe sur l'extrémité + du monomère à l’opposé de la gorge qui contient l’ATP (extrémité -) Bloque ainsi le côté du monomère qui s’associerait normalement à l’extrémité – du filament Le complexe actine-profiline peut facilement se fixer sur l’extrémité + libre d’un filament. Dès que le complexe actine-profiline est additionné  changement de conformation de l’actine  diminution de l’affinité actine / profiline  profiline part  allongement facilité #4p932

39 Résumé thymosine-profiline
Bloque le monomère partout Profiline Allonge le filament à son bout + « Déséquestre » l’actine de la thymosine

40 Fig16-29 – + Profiline liée à un monomère d'actine
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Profiline liée à un monomère d'actine Fixée sur l'extrémité + à l’opposé de la gorge qui contient l’ATP Peut allonger l’extrémité + du filament Ne peut pas allonger l’extrémité – du filament Fig16-29 #4p932 +

41 Compétition thymosine – profiline
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Compétition thymosine – profiline Compétition pour se fixer au monomère d’actine Activation locale de molécules de profiline  libération de l’actine séquestrée par la thymosine #4p932

42 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Résumé : Effets de la thymosine et de la profiline sur la polymérisation de l'actine Fig16-30(1) #4p932

43 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Effets de la thymosine et de la profiline sur la polymérisation de l'actine Fig16-30(2) #4p932

44 Régulation de l’activité de la profiline
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Régulation de l’activité de la profiline Par phosphorylation Par liaison aux phospholipides inositol (PI) Protéines intra cellulaires avec domaines riches en proline #4p933

45 Sites de régulation de la profiline
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Sites de régulation de la profiline Membrane plasmique Se lie aux phospholipides de la membrane plasmique En relation étroite avec l’extérieur pour faire croître lamellipodes ou filopodes #4p933

46 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 b) Tubuline C de tubuline libre dans la cellule > Cc [tubuline] en monomère en tube à essais Pourquoi la tubuline soluble ne polymérise-t- elle pas en microtubules dans la cellule ? Parce qu’il y a des protéines qui séquestrent la tubuline libre #4p934

47 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 La stathmine Se fixe sur deux hétérodimères de tubuline et empêche leur addition aux microtubules Diminue ainsi la concentration de tubuline disponible pour la polymérisation (comme la colchicine) #4p934

48 La stathmine Taux d’élongation d’un MT = Kon x [tubuline] 
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 La stathmine Taux d’élongation d’un MT = Kon x [tubuline]  Si [tubuline]   taux d’élongation  Or la stathmine  [tubuline] en la séquestrant  Stathmine  taux d’élongation du MT #4p934

49 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 La stathmine Le passage de l’état de croissance au désassemblage du microtubule est une course entre l’hydrolyse du GTP et l’allongement du filament  Comme la stathmine  [tubuline] en la séquestrant Stathmine  le désassemblage du microtubule #4p934

50 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Effets de la stathmine (=oncoprotéine 18) sur la polymérisation des microtubules Fig16-31 #4p934

51 Régulation de l’activité de la stathmine
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Régulation de l’activité de la stathmine Phosphorylation de la stathmine inhibe la fixation à la tubuline  Phosphorylation de la stathmine  taux d’élongation du microtubule  le désassemblage du microtubule (suppression de l’instabilité dynamique) #4p934

52 2 - Protéines de liaison latérale
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 2 - Protéines de liaison latérale Protéines qui se fixent le long du polymère pour le stabiliser ou le déstabiliser Tubuline Actine #5p935

53 a) Protéines de liaison latérale : tubuline
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 a) Protéines de liaison latérale : tubuline Les Microtubules Associated Proteins (MAPs) = protéines liées le long des microtubules (par définition) Peuvent stabiliser les microtubules contre le désassemblage (comme le taxol) Interaction des microtubules avec les autres composants de la cellule Forment la structure de base des axones et dendrites #5p935

54 Fig16-32 Localisation des MAPs dans les axones et les dendrites
Protéine  (vert) axone (ramifié) MAP 2 corps cellulaire et dendrites Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Fig16-32 #5p935

55 Deux domaines aux MAPs Un domaine lié au microtubule
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Deux domaines aux MAPs Un domaine lié au microtubule Un domaine qui se projette en dehors dont la longueur conditionne le degré d’empaquetage des microtubules MAP 2 : long domaine externe faisceaux de microtubules espacés Protéines  : domaine externe court faisceaux de microtubules compacts #5p935

56 Organisation des faisceaux de MT par les MAPs
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Cellule surexprimant MAP2 Cellule surexprimant tau Fig16-33 #5p935

57 Biochimie des MAPS (dont tau et MAP2)
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Biochimie des MAPS (dont tau et MAP2) Nombreuses copies d’un motif de liaison à la tubuline Ces MAPs + tubuline pure non polymérisée  nucléation  par stabilisation des premiers oligomères de tubuline Cibles de plusieurs protéine kinases #5p935

58 MAPs MAP2 et tau Autres MAPs
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 MAPs MAP2 et tau Localisées dans certains types de cellules des vertébrés Autres MAPs Rôle central dans la dynamique des microtubules chez presque tous les eucaryotes XMAP215 #5p935

59 XMAP215 Xenopus microtubule associated protein (masse molaire=215)
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 XMAP215 Xenopus microtubule associated protein (masse molaire=215) Ubiquitaire De la levure à l’homme Se lie le long des microtubules (devrait être dans §3) Capacité particulière à stabiliser les extrémités libres des microtubules Inhibe le passage de croissance à raccourcissement des microtubules Pendant la mitose il y a phosphorylation de XMAP215  inhibition de cette activité  augmentation 10X de instabilité des microtubules #5p935

60 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Fig A #5p935

61 Fig.18-12 B Pendant la mitose, phosphorylation de XMAP215 
Activité inhibée  Instabilité dynamique des microtubules pendant la mitose multipliée par 10 Fig B

62 b) Protéines de liaison latérale : actine
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 b) Protéines de liaison latérale : actine Tropomyosine Cofiline (=actine depolymerising factor) #5p936

63 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Tropomyosine Dans la plupart des cellules (pas que dans les cellules musculaires) Se lie à 7 sous-unités adjacentes d’actine dans le filament Empêche l’interaction avec d’autres protéines Rôle dans la contraction musculaire #5p936

64 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Fig.16-74 #5p936

65 Cofiline (=actine depolymerizing factor)
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Cofiline (=actine depolymerizing factor) Déstabilise le filament d’actine Peut se lier à la fois sur l’actine et sur le filament (inhabituel) Force le filament à s’enrouler plus serré  affaiblit les contacts entre les sous-unités d’actine du filament  filament plus cassant #5p936

66 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Modification de la morphologie du filament d'actine par la cofiline Fig16-34 Filament plus court et plus épais #5p936

67 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Mécanisme d’action 1/2 Facilite la dissociation d’une sous-unité d’actine-ADP à l’extrémité moins du filament Or c’est la lenteur de la dissociation à l’extrémité – qui limite le tapis roulant du filament  La liaison à la cofiline  accélération du tapis roulant  Le durée de vie des filaments dans la cellule est beaucoup plus courte que de l’actine pure en tube à essais #5p936

68 Mécanisme d’action 2/2 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 La cofiline préfère se lier à des filaments contenant de l’actine-ADP plutôt que de l’actine-ATP Or l’hydrolyse de l’ATP est plus lente que l’assemblage du filament  Les nouveaux filaments contiennent surtout de l’ATP-actine  La cofiline déstabilise plus les anciens filaments que les nouveaux  Accélère le turn over des filaments #5p936

69 3 - Protéines de liaison aux extrémités du filament
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 3 - Protéines de liaison aux extrémités du filament Actine Tubuline #6p937

70 Justification de ces protéines
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Protéines de liaison latérale (§ 2) Modifient la dynamique du filament Mais il en faut beaucoup (doit recouvrir tout le filament) 1 tropomyosine pour 7 actines 1 tau pour 4 tubulines 1 cofiline pour 1 actine Protéines de liaison aux extrémités du filament (§ 3) Mais peuvent être en très faible quantité 1 molécule par « filament » suffit (eg 1molécule pour actines) #6p937

71 a) Protéines de liaison aux extrémités du filament : actine
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 a) Protéines de liaison aux extrémités du filament : actine Protéines « cappantes » « cap » l’extrémité + du filament où ont lieu les changements les plus rapides du filament une fois que l’ATP de l’extrémité s’est transformée en ADP  Ralentit considérablement les vitesses d’allongement et de raccourcissement du filament en rendant l’extrémité + inactive #6p937

72 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Effet du capping des filaments (actine et pas tubuline) sur leur dynamique Fig16-35 #6p937

73 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Protéines cappantes La plupart des filaments sont « capés » à leur extrémité + eg : protéine CapZ (strie Z du muscle) Complexe ARP à l’extrémité – d’un filament (celui qui a permis la nucléation) #6p937

74 Régulation du « capping »
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Régulation du « capping » Régulation locale pour adapter le cytosquelette Signaux intra cellulaires PIP2 (phosphatidyl Inositol-2 Phosphate) régule les protéines qui « cappent » l’extrémité +  de PIP2 dans le feuillet cytosolique  dé « cappe » l’extrémité +  allongement  polymérisation en surface Dans les cellules musculaires durée de vie très longue des filaments d’actine CapZ au bout + Tropomoduline au bout – (+ Tropomysine tout le long pour stabiliser) #6p937

75 b) Protéines de liaison aux extrémités du filament : microtubule
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 b) Protéines de liaison aux extrémités du filament : microtubule Beaucoup plus compliqué 13 protofilaments Tube creux Rôle dans la dynamique des microtubules Rôle dans le contrôle du positionnement des microtubules #6p937

76 Protéines de liaison aux extrémités du microtubule
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Protéines de liaison aux extrémités du microtubule -tubuline ring complex Complexe protéique spécial qu’on trouve aux extrémités des microtubules des cils (cf. infra) Catastrophines MAPs #6p937

77 i - -tubuline ring complex (déjà vu)
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 i - -tubuline ring complex (déjà vu) Nuclée le microtubule « Cap » l’extrémité – #6p937

78 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 ii - Complexe protéique spécial qu’on trouve aux extrémités des microtubules des cils (cf. infra) #6p938

79 iii. Catastrophines Jouent sur la fréquence des « catastrophes »
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 iii. Catastrophines Jouent sur la fréquence des « catastrophes » Tendent à effilocher l’extrémité du filament Appartiennent à la superfamille des kinésines Synonyme : famille Kin 1 (qui comprend KIF2 cf. moteurs infra) #6p938

80 iv. MAPs Action inverse : tendent à favoriser la croissance
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 iv. MAPs Action inverse : tendent à favoriser la croissance #6p938

81 Effets de la liaison de protéines aux extrémités
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Effets de la liaison de protéines aux extrémités Fig16-36(A) #6p938

82 Régulation des protéines de liaison aux extrémités du microtubule
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Régulation des protéines de liaison aux extrémités du microtubule Toutes ces protéines sont régulées C’est ce qui se passe à la mitose #6p938

83 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Fig A #6p938

84 Fig.18-12 B Pendant la mitose, phosphorylation de XMAP215 
Activité inhibée  Instabilité dynamique des microtubules pendant la mitose multipliée par 10 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Fig B #6p938

85 Rôle dans le contrôle du positionnement des microtubules
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Rôle dans le contrôle du positionnement des microtubules A l’extrémité – : -tubuline ring complex A l’extrémité + : protéines de localisation des microtubules dans le cortex cellulaire eg : #6p938

86 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Conséquences de la liaison de protéines aux extrémités des microtubules EB1 = protéine cappante de MT (existe chez l’homme) Kar9 = protéine localisée vers la membrane Fig16-36(B) #6p938 Permet aux MT du fuseau de se diriger dans le bourgeon de croissance pendant la mitose

87 C - Organisation d'ordre supérieur (cross linking)
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 C - Organisation d'ordre supérieur (cross linking) Les protéines vues ci-dessus interviennent dans le dynamisme Il faut aussi stabiliser, assurer l’intégrité mécanique, forme Centrosome (nucléation, orientation des microtubules, milieu de la cellule…) MAPs Tropomyosine … #7p

88 Différentes organisations faisant appel au cross linking
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Différentes organisations faisant appel au cross linking Filaments intermédiaires Association latérale des filaments entre eux Protéines accessoires Actine Deux types de protéines (tropomyosine pour stabilisation + autres protéines pour le cross linking) Microtubules MAPs ont deux domaines (MT, extérieur) #7p939

89 Différentes organisations faisant appel au cross linking
Filaments intermédiaires Les différents types d’organisation des filaments d’actine Effets de la fragmentation des filaments sur leur dynamique Microtubules : catanine Actine : gelsoline Exemple : activation des plaquettes

90 1 - Filaments intermédiaires

91 Organisation du réseau de filaments intermédiaires
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Organisation du réseau de filaments intermédiaires Structure du filament  robustesse Protéine NF-M et NF-H ont un domaine C-terminal qui forme une projection qui se lie aux FI voisins Filagrine : permet le maintien des faisceaux de FI de kératine Plectine : nombreuses propriétés #8p939

92 Plectine Permet le maintien des faisceaux de vimentine
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Plectine Permet le maintien des faisceaux de vimentine Lie les faisceaux de FI (vimentine) aux Microtubules Filaments d’actine Myosine II Membrane plasmique #8p939

93 Liaison des filaments intermédiaires aux filaments intermédiaires
Liaison des filaments intermédiaires aux microtubules Liaison des filaments intermédiaires aux filaments épais de myosine Grâce à la plectine (anticorps marqués à l'or) Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Fig16-37 Plectine #8p939 FI MT Cross linking de la plectine aux différents éléments du cytosquelette

94 Mutations dans le gène de la plectine
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Mutations dans le gène de la plectine Maladie très grave Épidermolyse bulleuse (filaments de kératine) Dystrophie musculaire (filaments de desmine) Dégénérescence nerveuse (neurofilaments) Chez la souris Mort en quelques jours Phlyctènes de la peau Atteintes musculaire et cardiaque #8p939

95 2 - Différents types d'organisation des filaments d'actine
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 2 - Différents types d'organisation des filaments d'actine Faisceau de filaments Gel #9p940

96 Fig16-38 Organisation des filaments d'actine
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Fig16-38 #9p940 Fibres de stress (tension) Exploration de l’environnement

97  2 types de protéines cross linking
Protéines formant les faisceaux Filaments parallèles Connexion rigide entre les deux domaines de liaison à l’actine Protéines formant un gel ou un réseau Filaments à grand angle Connexion à courbe rigide ou flexible Les deux ont deux sites identiques de liaison aux filaments d’actine (monomère ou dimère)

98 Fig16-39 Quatre exemples de protéines de liaison à l'actine
Deux sites de liaison à l'actine (avec séquence proche) Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Fig16-39 #9p940

99 Exemples de protéines cross linking
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Exemples de protéines cross linking Faisceau Gel ou réseau #9p940

100 Faisceau Fimbrine -actinine Villine 14 nm entre deux filaments
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Fimbrine 14 nm entre deux filaments Localisation dans les filopodes et bord avant Microvillosité -actinine 30 nm entre deux filaments (plus lâche) Fibres de stress Contacts focaux Villine Deux sites proches de liaison à l’actine ( fimbrine) Même famille que la gelsoline (cf. infra) #9p940

101 Gel ou réseau Filamine Spectrine 
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Gel ou réseau Filamine liaison en V  filaments à angle droit Spectrine 200 nm Forme un réseau Les protéines cross linking déterminent le type de structure d’actine… #9p940

102 Fig16-40 Formation de deux types de faisceaux d'actine
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Formation de deux types de faisceaux d'actine Fig16-40 #9p940 -Actinine purifiée

103 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 … Les protéines cross linking déterminent le type de structure d’actine… …et donc le type des autres molécules qui vont interagir -actinine  myosine II  fibres de stress contractiles Fimbrine  exclut la myosine  les filopodes ne sont pas contractiles Villine   fimbrine #9p941

104 Microvillosité Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Extension en doigt de gant de la membrane plasmique des cellules épithéliales 0,08 m x 1 m Cellules à fonction d’absorption Augmente la surface d’absorption x20 Entérocyte : plusieurs milliers de microvillosités au pôle apical 20 – 30 filaments d’actine en faisceau Fimbrine + actine Fibroblaste injecté de villine  microvillosité plus longues et plus nombreuses Bras latéraux de myosine I entre le faisceau d’actine et les lipides de la membrane plasmique #9p941

105 Fig16-41(A) Microvillosité
Extension en doigt de gant de la membrane plasmique des cellules épithéliales 0,08 m x 1 m Cellules à fonction d’absorption Augmente la surface d’absorption x20 Entérocyte : plusieurs milliers de microvillosités au pôle apical 20 – 30 filaments d’actine en faisceau Fimbrine + villine Fibroblaste injecté de villine  microvillosité plus longues et plus nombreuses Bras latéraux de myosine I entre le faisceau d’actine et les lipides de la membrane plasmique Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Fig16-41(A) #9p941 Microvillosité

106 Fig16-41(BC) Microvillosité (cryofracture)
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Microvillosité (cryofracture) Fig16-41(BC) Contient spectrine et myosine II Au-dessous : couche de filaments intermédiaires #9p941

107 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Fig. 1. A summary of the main events that correlate with the localization of the major actin-binding proteins to the microvilli during brush border formation. Three stages in the assembly of microvilli and the terminal web in the apical cytoplasm of a developing chicken enterocyte are illustrated. (a) Early membrane projections expressing both ezrin and villin contain several actin filaments lying near the membrane. (b) Later, as the microvillus elongates, the number of actin filaments increases and myosin-l links the core filaments with the microvillus membrane. Both plasma membrane and myosinmay be supplied to the microvillus by Golgi-derived vesicles. (c) Coincident with the appearance of fimbrin, the number and length of the actin filaments increases and the core filaments become hexagonally packed. Karl R. Fath and David R. Burgess Microvillus Assembly: Not actin alone Current Biology Volume 5, Issue 6 , June 1995, Pages Karl R. Fath and David R. Burgess Microvillus Assembly: Not actin alone Current Biology Volume 5, Issue 6 , June 1995, Pages Fig. 1. A summary of the main events that correlate with the localization of the major actin-binding proteins to the microvilli during brush border formation. Three stages in the assembly of microvilli and the terminal web in the apical cytoplasm of a developing chicken enterocyte are illustrated. (a) Early membrane projections expressing both ezrin and villin contain several actin filaments lying near the membrane. (b) Later, as the microvillus elongates, the number of actin filaments increases and myosin-l links the core filaments with the microvillus membrane. Both plasma membrane and myosinmay be supplied to the microvillus by Golgi-derived vesicles. (c) Coincident with the appearance of fimbrin, the number and length of the actin filaments increases and the core filaments become hexagonally packed

108 Formation de réseau : spectrine
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Formation de réseau : spectrine Conditionne la formation d’un réseau Identifiée pour la première fois dans les globules rouges Protéine longue et flexible 4 chaînes polypeptidiques (Deux  et deux ) Les sites d’actine sont séparés de 200 nm Réseau à 2-D maintenu par de l’actine sous la membrane plasmique dans le globule rouge Protéines membranaires #9p941

109 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Fig 10-31 #9p941

110 Globule rouge Cortex cellulaire rigide
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Globule rouge Cortex cellulaire rigide Reprise de la forme du globule rouge après passage dans un capillaire Équivalents de spectrine dans le cortex des autres types cellulaires des vertébrés #9p942

111 Formation d’un gel : filamine
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Formation d’un gel : filamine Servent dans les lamellipodes qui permettent à la cellule de ramper sur un support #9p942

112 Formation d'un gel (3-D) par la filamine
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Formation d'un gel (3-D) par la filamine Fig16-42 #9p942

113 Fig16-43 Cellules de mélanome Peu de filamine (mobilité anormale)
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Cellules de mélanome Peu de filamine (mobilité anormale) Pas de lamellipodes Bulles anormales à la surface Peu de déplacement Pas de métastase Restauration artificielle de la filamine Lamellipodes Hautement métastasiante Fig16-43 #9p943

114 3 - Effets de la fragmentation des filaments sur leur dynamique
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 3 - Effets de la fragmentation des filaments sur leur dynamique Cassure d’un filament (en des douzaines de fragments)  nombre d’extrémités + et –  Sous certaines conditions :  des sites de nucléation et  allongement Sous d’autres conditions: dépolymérisation des vieux filaments  Changement des propriétés physiques et mécaniques du cytoplasme Les faisceaux et gels deviennent plus fluides #10p943

115 Effets de la fragmentation des filaments sur leur dynamique
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Effets de la fragmentation des filaments sur leur dynamique Fig16-44 #10p943

116 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Intervention de protéines cassantes sur la longueur et la dynamique des MF et microtubules Microtubules Katanine Actine Gelsoline #10p943

117 a - Microtubules : katanine
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 a - Microtubules : katanine « épée » en japonais Peut casser les 13 protofilaments d’un microtubule Deux sous-unités Petite : hydrolyse ATP + casse le protofilament Grosse : dirige la katanine vers le centrosome #10p943

118 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Rôle de la katanine Libère les microtubules de leur point d’attache à un centre organisateur de microtubules Applications Dépolymérisation rapide des microtubules aux pôles du fuseau à la mitose Cellules en prolifération Neurones #10p943

119 Fig16-45 Cassure des microtubules par la katanine
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Cassure des microtubules par la katanine 30 s après l'addition de Katanine Même champ 3 minutes après l'addition de la Katanine Fig16-45 #10p943 MT marqués par la rhodamine et stabilisés par le taxol adsorbés sur une plaque de verre

120 b - Microfilaments d’actine : gelsoline
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 b - Microfilaments d’actine : gelsoline Superfamille des gelsolines Peut casser le filament d’actine Activité activée par une forte [Ca++]cytosolique Ne nécessite pas d’ATP #10p943

121 Gelsoline Possède des sous-domaines dont deux sites
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Gelsoline Possède des sous-domaines dont deux sites Qui se lient à deux sites différents de la sous-unité d’actine Un à la surface du filament Un caché dans la liaison avec la sous-unité suivante #10p

122 Mode d’action présumé de la gelsoline
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Mode d’action présumé de la gelsoline Liaison sur le côté d’un filament d’actine par un des 2 sites de liaison de la gelsoline à l’actine Fluctuation thermique  fente entre des sous-unités voisines du protofilament d’actine Infiltration de la gelsoline dans la fente  Cassure du filament « Capping » de la gelsoline à l’extrémité du filament par son 2ème site de fixation à l’actine Peut être retirée du filament par une augmentation de PIP2 #10p944

123 Fig16-46 Modèle de cassure du filament d'actine par la gelsoline
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Modèle de cassure du filament d'actine par la gelsoline Fig16-46 #10p944

124 4 - Application : activation des plaquettes
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 4 - Application : activation des plaquettes Très bel exemple de Régulation des protéines accessoires à l’actine Cassure, « capping », cross linking  Grosses modifications morphologiques #10p944

125 Plaquette au repos Circule dans le sang Pas de noyau
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Plaquette au repos Circule dans le sang Pas de noyau Forment le caillot Forme discoïde Actine sous forme de filaments courts « Cappés » par CapZ Beaucoup de monomères d’actine liés à la profiline #10p944

126 Activation de la plaquette
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Activation de la plaquette Par contact physique avec un vaisseau endommagé Ou agent chimique comme la thrombine #10p944

127 Mécanisme de l’activation
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Mécanisme de l’activation Cascade de signalisation intra cellulaire  Afflux massif de Ca++ dans le cytosol Ca++ active gelsoline Gelsoline casse et « cap » les filaments en filaments plus petits Qui sont maintenant « cappés » de gelsoline  de PIP2  Inactivation de gelsoline et CapZ Qui sont retirées toutes les deux  #10p944

128 Mécanisme de l’activation
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Mécanisme de l’activation Augmentation du nombre d’extrémités libres Qui sont rapidement allongés par les nombreuses sous-unités libres d’actine  Nombreux filaments longs #10p944

129 Intervention des autres protéines de liaison à l’actine
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Intervention des autres protéines de liaison à l’actine Ces nombreux filaments longs sont transformés en gel par la gelsoline D’autres sont transformés en faisceaux par -actinine et fimbrine #10p944

130 Fin de l’activation de la plaquette
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Fin de l’activation de la plaquette Formation de lamellipodes et filopodes pour recouvrir le caillot Et fixation des plaquettes au caillot par des intégrines #10p944

131 Retour au repos Le signal PIP2 s’affaisse
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Retour au repos Le signal PIP2 s’affaisse CapZ retourne aux extrémités des filaments Les filaments redeviennent stables Les plaquettes reprennent leur forme étalée Myosine II hydrolyse de l’ATP pour glisse le long des filaments d’actine les uns par rapport aux autres  Contraction de la plaquette qui rapproche les berges de la plaie #10p944

132 Activation plaquettaire
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Fig16-47(A) #10p944

133 Fig16-47(BCD) Activation plaquettaire
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Activation plaquettaire Avant l’activation Plaquette activée Après contraction de la myosine II Fig16-47(BCD) #10p944

134 D - Fixation des éléments du cytosquelette à la membrane plasmique
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Rôle du cytosquelette dans la forme et la rigidité de la membrane plasmique de la cellule Cortex du GR : réseau actine + spectrine Microvillosité : faisceau actine + villine Deux facteurs dans le maintien de ces structures Maintien des filaments d’actine en faisceau et cross linking des filaments Fixation spécifique des filaments d’actine aux protéines ou lipides de la membrane plasmique De plus connexion des structures internes de la cellule à son environnement Autres cellules Matrice extra cellulaire #11p944

135 Continuum entre l’intérieur et l’extérieur de la cellule
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Continuum entre l’intérieur et l’extérieur de la cellule Éléments du cytosol >< Actine et filaments intermédiaires >< protéines transmembranaires  adhésion cellulaire Cf. chapitre matrice extra cellulaire pour connexions membrane  matrice extra cellulaire #11p945

136 Famille ERM (Ezérine – Radixine – Moésine)
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Famille ERM (Ezérine – Radixine – Moésine) Protéines intra cellulaires proches les unes des autres Attachent les filaments d’actine à la membrane plasmique Extrémité – C de la protéine se lie directement au filament d’actine Extrémité - N de la protéine se lie à la face cytoplasmique de glycoprotéines trans-membranaires dont CD44 (récepteur à l’acide hyaluronique) #11p945

137 Neurofibromatose Maladie génétique
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Neurofibromatose Maladie génétique Tumeurs nerveuses bénignes multiples Mutations dans les protéines ERM Mutation  perte d’une protéine (appelée merline) de la famille ERM #11p945

138 Merlin-organized complexes prevent mitogenic signaling and contact-dependent inhibition of proliferation. (Left) At low cell density in cell culture, Merlin is predominantly hyperphosphorylated and inactive and mitogenic signaling proceeds. Similarly, upon cell reattachment to certain ECM substrates, a pool of Merlin is rapidly phosphorylated. (Right) At high cell density in cell culture, Merlin is hypophosphorylated, self-associated, and active in mediating contact-dependent inhibition of proliferation. Merlin is recruited to nascent cell:cell boundaries where it appears to stabilize AJs between cells, perhaps by inhibiting Rac/Pak signaling and/or stabilizing the actin cytoskeleton. Under these conditions, Merlin may inhibit signaling from AJ-associated growth-factor receptors. Hypophosphorylated Merlin can also interact with cell:ECM receptors such as CD44, which binds to hyaluronic acid (HA); increased CD44:HA interaction with increased cell density leads to high levels of active Merlin, which may inhibit associated growth-factor receptors. Notably, complete cell detachment also leads to hypophosphorylation and activation of Merlin. Perhaps inhibited mitogenic signaling from multiple complexes accumulates, reaching a threshold that halts proliferation. The study and manipulation of cell:cell contact in two dimensions in cell culture is nonphysiological; in vivo cells in a tissue are contacting other cells and can override contact-dependent inhibition of proliferation under certain normal conditions or in the context of a tumor. Merlin may coordinate the receipt of physical information from the extracellular milieu with the receipt and processing of mitogenic stimuli. Lundi 22 octobre 2007 GENES & DEVELOPMENT 19: , REVIEW Membrane organization and tumorigenesis—the NF2 tumor suppressor, Merlin Andrea I. McClatchey and Marco Giovannini GENES & DEVELOPMENT 19: , 2005 REVIEW Membrane organization and tumorigenesis—the NF2 tumor suppressor, Merlin Andrea I. McClatchey and Marco Giovannini Figure 2. Merlin-organized complexes prevent mitogenic signaling and contact-dependent inhibition of proliferation. (Left) At low cell density in cell culture, Merlin is predominantly hyperphosphorylated and inactive and mitogenic signaling proceeds. Similarly, upon cell reattachment to certain ECM substrates, a pool of Merlin is rapidly phosphorylated. (Right) At high cell density in cell culture, Merlin is hypophosphorylated, self-associated, and active in mediating contact-dependent inhibition of proliferation. Merlin is recruited to nascent cell:cell boundaries where it appears to stabilize AJs between cells, perhaps by inhibiting Rac/Pak signaling and/or stabilizing the actin cytoskeleton. Under these conditions, Merlin may inhibit signaling from AJ-associated growth-factor receptors. Hypophosphorylated Merlin can also interact with cell:ECM receptors such as CD44, which binds to hyaluronic acid (HA); increased CD44:HA interaction with increased cell density leads to high levels of active Merlin, which may inhibit associated growth-factor receptors. Notably, complete cell detachment also leads to hypophosphorylation and activation of Merlin. Perhaps inhibited mitogenic signaling from multiple complexes accumulates, reaching a threshold that halts proliferation. The study and manipulation of cell:cell contact in two dimensions in cell culture is nonphysiological; in vivo cells in a tissue are contacting other cells and can override contact-dependent inhibition of proliferation under certain normal conditions or in the context of a tumor. Merlin may coordinate the receipt of physical information from the extracellular milieu with the receipt and processing of mitogenic stimuli.

139 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Régulation des protéines d’attachement des filaments d’actine à la membrane plasmique Spectrine ou myosine I  régulation par des signaux intra cellulaires Protéines ERM  régulation par des signaux intra et extra cellulaires #11p945

140 Les deux conformations des protéines ERM
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Les deux conformations des protéines ERM Conformation déroulée active : oligomérise et se lie à l’actine et à CD44 Conformation repliée inactive : les extrémités N – et C – terminales sont liées entre-elles Passage d’une conformation à l’autre Phosphorylation Liaison à PIP2 En réponse à des signaux extra cellulaires #11p945 Les deux conformations des protéines ERM Conformation déroulée active : oligomérise et se lie à l’actine et à CD44 Conformation repliée inactive : les extrémités N – et C – terminales sont liées entre-elles Passage d’une conformation à l’autre Phosphorylation Liaison à PIP2 En réponse à des signaux extra cellulaires

141 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Rôle des protéines de la famille ERM dans l'attachement des filaments d'actine à la membrane plasmique Fig16-48 #11p945 (ezrine, radixine, moésine)

142 Rapport du cytosquelette avec les jonctions cellulaires
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Rapport du cytosquelette avec les jonctions cellulaires Cytosquelette  matrice extra cellulaire Cytosquelette  cellule voisine #12p946

143 1 - Cytosquelette  matrice extra cellulaire : contacts focaux
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 1 - Cytosquelette  matrice extra cellulaire : contacts focaux Terminaison à leur niveau des fibres de stress constituées de faisceaux d’actine et myosine II Présence d’intégrines à leur niveau Intégrines (cf chapitre MEC) Protéines d’adhésion trans-membranaire Se lient indirectement aux faisceaux d’actine #12p946

144 Fonctions des contacts focaux
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Fonctions des contacts focaux Permet à la cellule de tirer sur son support : via fibres de stress Relais de signaux de la matrice extra cellulaire vers le cytosol : via FAK #12p946

145 Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK)
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) C’est une tyrosine kinase Activée par l’agrégation des intégrines des contacts focaux Sensible au substrat de la cellule et la force de tension : comment ?? Cible de la Src tyrosine kinase cytoplasmique Phosphoryle de nombreuse cibles  régule survie, croissance, prolifération, morphologie, mouvement, différenciation des cellules en réponse à l’environnement #12p946

146 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Contacts focaux et fibres de stress dans un fibroblaste en culture Fig16-49 #12p946 Microscopie à contraste interférentiel Anticorps anti-actine

147 2 - Cytosquelette  cellule voisine: cadhérines
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 2 - Cytosquelette  cellule voisine: cadhérines Protéines trans-membranaires Queue cytoplasmique se lient aux caténines qui se lient à l’actine Jonctions adhérentes = amas de contacts cellules-cellules à cadhérine-actine #12p947

148 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Molécule de cadhérine Fig A-B #12p947

149 Fig C

150 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Autres structures cytosquelette  cellule voisine : desmosomes et hémidesmosomes Filaments intermédiaires – membrane plasmique Desmosomes : cellules - cellules Hémidesmosomes : cellules - matrice #12p947

151 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Retentissement des signaux extra cellulaires sur le cytosquelette : deux cibles Protéines associées aux éléments du cytosquelette Longueur, localisation , organisation dynamique Signal extra cellulaire  cytosquelette via protéines accessoires GTPases monomériques membres de la famille des protéine Rho* À l’intérieur de la cellule Cible de nombreux récepteurs membranaires #13p947 Dia70 du cours sur Aspects moléculaires des vésicules : Rôle des protéines Rab dans l'amarrage des protéines de transport : ce ne sont pas les Rho * (ne pas confondre avec Rab  amarrage des protéines de transport

152 Famille des protéines Rho
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Famille des protéines Rho Rho GTP-Binding Proteins Une grande famille de protéines monomériques de liaison au GTP impliquée Dans la régulation de l’organisation de l’actine L’expression des gènes Et la progression du cycle cellulaire This enzyme was formerly listed as EC Year introduced: 2000 #13p947

153 Cells receive extracellular stimuli in the form of soluble molecules (growth factors, cytokines and hormones) that bind to cell surface receptors, adhesive interactions (extracellular matrix and cell-cell adhesion) or mechanical stresses (tension, compression and fluid shear stress). These stimuli act upon guanine-nucleotide-exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) to control the activation state of the small GTPases Rho, Rac and Cdc42. Once activated, the GTPases bind to a spectrum of effectors to stimulate downstream signaling pathways. The pathways shown in the poster represent the major effector pathways for these Rho family GTPases. The total number of effectors is too large to be shown here, and I apologize to authors whose work could not be included. [Excellent reviews for these effector pathways are available; for detailed information, please see (Bishop and Hall, 2000; Symons and Settleman, 2000; Bokoch, 2003; Ridley, 2001; Yoshimi et al., 2001; Riento and Ridley, 2003).] Other Rho family proteins are not included but readers are referred to a recent review (Wennerberg and Der, 2004). Protein kinase N1 (PKN1, also known as PRK) and PKN2 are Rho effectors involved in endosomal trafficking. Citron is a ROCK-related kinase that is critical for cytokinesis and is also implicated in other aspects of cell cycle progression. Mammalian diaphanous protein 1 (mDia1, also known as dia-related formin or DRF), mDia2 and mDia3 mediate both actin polymerization through a profilin-dependent mechanism and stabilization of microtubule plus ends in cell migration. Rho kinase 1 (also known as ROCK1) and ROCK2 are key Rho effectors that have multiple substrates. A partial list includes the myosin-binding subunit of the myosin phosphatase (MBS), which leads to inhibition of phosphatase activity, increased myosin light chain phosphorylation and hence increased tension generation; LIM kinase (LIMK), which phosphorylates cofilin to release actin monomers and promote actin polymerization; and myosin regulatory light chain itself, which again promotes contractility. Rho kinase phosphorylates ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family proteins to activate their function as linkers between actin and the plasma membrane. Rho kinases also phosphorylate the Na/H+ antiporter NHE-1 to promote actin-membrane interactions and several intermediate filament proteins (desmin, vimentin and glial fibrillary acidic protein) to regulate intermediate filament structure. Both Rac and Rho bind to phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase (PIP5K); activation of PIP5K by Rho also requires Rho kinases. Production of phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2] contributes to the activation of ERM proteins and to actin polymerization through WASP, profilin and multiple actin-capping proteins. Other reported substrates for Rho kinases that are not pictured include MARCKS, EF-1, calponin, CPI-17 and collapsin-response mediator protein 2. Rac has numerous effectors that mediate effects on the cytoskeleton and gene expression. Rac binds p67 PHOX to increase activation of the NADPH oxidase system and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which mediate activation of NF-B-dependent gene expression, effects of Rac on cell cycle progression and inhibition of Rho activity. Rac binds the WAVE complex (also containing Abi and IRSp53/58), to release active WAVE, which promotes actin polymerization in lamellipodia through activation of the Arp2/3 complex. Both Rac and Cdc42 bind and activate the kinases PAK1, PAK2 and PAK3. PAKs have multiple substrates, including LIM kinase, which leads to actin polymerization; OP18/stathmin, which stabilizes microtubule plus ends; and Raf-1 and MEK1, whose phosphorylation by PAK enhances transmission of the signal to ERK. PAK activity also regulates myosin phosphorylation and cell contractility through several pathways, including myosin light chain kinase, myosin regulatory light chain, myosin heavy chain and caldesmon. Other pathways not listed on the diagram include filamin A, which cooperates with PAK to promote membrane ruffling; components of the paxillin-GIT/PKL-P1X complex, which regulates cell adhesion and motility; and the apoptotic regulator BAD, which promotes cell survival. Rac and Cdc42 are important activators of Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38, which stimulate AP-1-dependent gene expression. Mixed lineage kinases (MLKs) appear to be the major Rac/Cdc42 effectors leading to JNK and p38 activity. Rac and Cdc42 also bind to the actin-binding protein IQGAP, which is implicated in regulation of cell-cell adhesion. Both Rac and Cdc42 also bind and stimulate PI 3-kinase. The resultant 3'-phosphorylated lipids bind to and stimulate Rac GEFs, creating a positive feedback loop that maintains cell migration. WASP (and the more widely expressed N-WASP) are critical downstream effectors of Cdc42 that mediate formation of filopodia. These effectors also require PtdIns(4,5)P2 and interact directly with Arp2/3 complex to promote actin polymerization. Cdc42 activates the serine/threonine kinase MRCK, which is related to Rho kinases and can promote myosin phosphorylation. Cdc42 also activates the tyrosine kinases ACK1 and ACK2; the latter regulates focal adhesion formation and organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Cdc42 promotes oncogenic transformation in part by binding to the and coatamer proteins and regulating membrane trafficking. Finally, Cdc42 is the critical determinant of polarity in a wide variety of developmental systems; this involves binding of Cdc42 to PAR6. PAR6 is a component of a complex containing PAR3 and atypical protein kinase C (PKC or PKC). This complex regulates positioning of the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) in migrating cells and early embryos, and tight junction formation in epithelia. Borg proteins are Cdc42 effectors that connect to septins, structural proteins that can polymerize to form filaments involved in cytokinesis in yeast and mammalian cells, and that probably carry out additional structural roles in mammalian cells as well (Joberty et al., 2001). Finally, the poster displays some of the major feedback loops among Rho GTPases and their effector pathways. Formation of integrin-dependent cell-ECM adhesion formation, cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion formation and PI 3-kinase activation influence the function of GEFs and GAPs for Rho family GTPases. These positive and negative regulatory loops appear to be important for cell motility and perhaps other processes. Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Rho signalling at a glance J. Cell Sci 117, (2004) Martin Schwartz Cells receive extracellular stimuli in the form of soluble molecules (growth factors, cytokines and hormones) that bind to cell surface receptors, adhesive interactions (extracellular matrix and cell-cell adhesion) or mechanical stresses (tension, compression and fluid shear stress). These stimuli act upon guanine-nucleotide-exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) to control the activation state of the small GTPases Rho, Rac and Cdc42. Once activated, the GTPases bind to a spectrum of effectors to stimulate downstream signaling pathways. The pathways shown in the poster represent the major effector pathways for these Rho family GTPases. The total number of effectors is too large to be shown here, and I apologize to authors whose work could not be included. [Excellent reviews for these effector pathways are available; for detailed information, please see (Bishop and Hall, 2000; Symons and Settleman, 2000; Bokoch, 2003; Ridley, 2001; Yoshimi et al., 2001; Riento and Ridley, 2003).] Other Rho family proteins are not included but readers are referred to a recent review (Wennerberg and Der, 2004). Protein kinase N1 (PKN1, also known as PRK) and PKN2 are Rho effectors involved in endosomal trafficking. Citron is a ROCK-related kinase that is critical for cytokinesis and is also implicated in other aspects of cell cycle progression. Mammalian diaphanous protein 1 (mDia1, also known as dia-related formin or DRF), mDia2 and mDia3 mediate both actin polymerization through a profilin-dependent mechanism and stabilization of microtubule plus ends in cell migration. Rho kinase 1 (also known as ROCK1) and ROCK2 are key Rho effectors that have multiple substrates. A partial list includes the myosin-binding subunit of the myosin phosphatase (MBS), which leads to inhibition of phosphatase activity, increased myosin light chain phosphorylation and hence increased tension generation; LIM kinase (LIMK), which phosphorylates cofilin to release actin monomers and promote actin polymerization; and myosin regulatory light chain itself, which again promotes contractility. Rho kinase phosphorylates ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family proteins to activate their function as linkers between actin and the plasma membrane. Rho kinases also phosphorylate the Na/H+ antiporter NHE-1 to promote actin-membrane interactions and several intermediate filament proteins (desmin, vimentin and glial fibrillary acidic protein) to regulate intermediate filament structure. Both Rac and Rho bind to phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase (PIP5K); activation of PIP5K by Rho also requires Rho kinases. Production of phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2] contributes to the activation of ERM proteins and to actin polymerization through WASP, profilin and multiple actin-capping proteins. Other reported substrates for Rho kinases that are not pictured include MARCKS, EF-1, calponin, CPI-17 and collapsin-response mediator protein 2. Rac has numerous effectors that mediate effects on the cytoskeleton and gene expression. Rac binds p67 PHOX to increase activation of the NADPH oxidase system and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which mediate activation of NF-B-dependent gene expression, effects of Rac on cell cycle progression and inhibition of Rho activity. Rac binds the WAVE complex (also containing Abi and IRSp53/58), to release active WAVE, which promotes actin polymerization in lamellipodia through activation of the Arp2/3 complex. Both Rac and Cdc42 bind and activate the kinases PAK1, PAK2 and PAK3. PAKs have multiple substrates, including LIM kinase, which leads to actin polymerization; OP18/stathmin, which stabilizes microtubule plus ends; and Raf-1 and MEK1, whose phosphorylation by PAK enhances transmission of the signal to ERK. PAK activity also regulates myosin phosphorylation and cell contractility through several pathways, including myosin light chain kinase, myosin regulatory light chain, myosin heavy chain and caldesmon. Other pathways not listed on the diagram include filamin A, which cooperates with PAK to promote membrane ruffling; components of the paxillin-GIT/PKL-P1X complex, which regulates cell adhesion and motility; and the apoptotic regulator BAD, which promotes cell survival. Rac and Cdc42 are important activators of Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38, which stimulate AP-1-dependent gene expression. Mixed lineage kinases (MLKs) appear to be the major Rac/Cdc42 effectors leading to JNK and p38 activity. Rac and Cdc42 also bind to the actin-binding protein IQGAP, which is implicated in regulation of cell-cell adhesion. Both Rac and Cdc42 also bind and stimulate PI 3-kinase. The resultant 3'-phosphorylated lipids bind to and stimulate Rac GEFs, creating a positive feedback loop that maintains cell migration. WASP (and the more widely expressed N-WASP) are critical downstream effectors of Cdc42 that mediate formation of filopodia. These effectors also require PtdIns(4,5)P2 and interact directly with Arp2/3 complex to promote actin polymerization. Cdc42 activates the serine/threonine kinase MRCK, which is related to Rho kinases and can promote myosin phosphorylation. Cdc42 also activates the tyrosine kinases ACK1 and ACK2; the latter regulates focal adhesion formation and organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Cdc42 promotes oncogenic transformation in part by binding to the and coatamer proteins and regulating membrane trafficking. Finally, Cdc42 is the critical determinant of polarity in a wide variety of developmental systems; this involves binding of Cdc42 to PAR6. PAR6 is a component of a complex containing PAR3 and atypical protein kinase C (PKC or PKC). This complex regulates positioning of the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) in migrating cells and early embryos, and tight junction formation in epithelia. Borg proteins are Cdc42 effectors that connect to septins, structural proteins that can polymerize to form filaments involved in cytokinesis in yeast and mammalian cells, and that probably carry out additional structural roles in mammalian cells as well (Joberty et al., 2001). Finally, the poster displays some of the major feedback loops among Rho GTPases and their effector pathways. Formation of integrin-dependent cell-ECM adhesion formation, cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion formation and PI 3-kinase activation influence the function of GEFs and GAPs for Rho family GTPases. These positive and negative regulatory loops appear to be important for cell motility and perhaps other processes.

154 Famille des protéines Rho
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Famille des protéines Rho Appartiennent à la super famille Ras 3 membres de la famille GTPases Cdc42 : active WASp Rac : active WASp (dans sa forme GTP) Rho Agissent comme des interrupteurs moléculaires Actif : liaison au GTP Inactif : liaison au GDP #13p947

155 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Fig. 3-70 #13p947

156 Etienne-Manneville,S2002p629
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Le cycle de la GTPase Rho Figure 1 The Rho GTPase cycle. Twenty mammalian Rho GTPases have been described: Rho (three isoforms: A, B, C); Rac (1, 2, 3); Cdc42; TC10; TCL; Chp (1, 2); RhoG; Rnd (1, 2, 3); RhoBTB (1, 2); RhoD; Rif; and TTF. They cycle between an active (GTP-bound) and an inactive (GDP-bound) conformation. In the active state, they interact with one of over 60 target proteins (effectors). The cycle is highly regulated by three classes of protein: in mammalian cells, around 60 guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) catalyse nucleotide exchange and mediate activation; more than 70 GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) stimulate GTP hydrolysis, leading to inactivation; and four guanine nucleotide exchange inhibitors (GDIs) extract the inactive GTPase from membranes. All Rho GTPases are prenylated at their C terminus, and this is required for function. Rnd proteins are exceptional in that they do not hydrolyse GTP in vitro, which is an unusual property for a regulatory GTPase. It has been argued that they are controlled by expression, but it is equally possible that a yet to be identified GAP is required for hydrolysis. Etienne-Manneville,S2002p629 Figure 1 The Rho GTPase cycle. Twenty mammalian Rho GTPases have been described: Rho (three isoforms: A, B, C); Rac (1, 2, 3); Cdc42; TC10; TCL; Chp (1, 2); RhoG; Rnd (1, 2, 3); RhoBTB (1, 2); RhoD; Rif; and TTF. They cycle between an active (GTP-bound) and an inactive (GDP-bound) conformation. In the active state, they interact with one of over 60 target proteins (effectors). The cycle is highly regulated by three classes of protein: in mammalian cells, around 60 guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) catalyse nucleotide exchange and mediate activation; more than 70 GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) stimulate GTP hydrolysis, leading to inactivation; and four guanine nucleotide exchange inhibitors (GDIs) extract the inactive GTPase from membranes. All Rho GTPases are prenylated at their C terminus, and this is required for function. Rnd proteins are exceptional in that they do not hydrolyse GTP in vitro, which is an unusual property for a regulatory GTPase. It has been argued that they are controlled by expression, but it is equally possible that a yet to be identified GAP is required for hydrolysis. GDI : guanine nucleotide exchange inhibitors

157 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 1 - Cdc42 Active WASp #13p947

158 2 - Rac-GTP Active WASp Active PI(4)P-5 kinase  Génère PI(4,5)P2 
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 2 - Rac-GTP Active WASp Active PI(4)P-5 kinase  Génère PI(4,5)P2  Dé - « capping »  des filaments dont l’extrémité + est liée à la gelsoline ou CapZ  Plus de sites d’assemblage à l’actine près de la membrane plasmique  Lamellipodes et ondulations #13p947

159 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 3 - Rho-GTP Active une protéine kinase qui inhibe une phosphatase qui agit sur les chaînes légères de myosine  Augmentation des chaînes légères de myosine phosphorylées  Augmentation de l’activité contractile de la myosine  Augmentation des fibres de stress #13p947

160 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Illustration Fig A #13p947

161 Coloration négative en microscopie électronique de filaments de myosine II (plus courts que ceux que l’on trouve dans la cellule musculaire striée) assemblés in vitro par phosphorylation de leurs chaînes légères Fig B

162 Membres de la famille WASp
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Membres de la famille WASp Conformation inactive repliée / active dépliée (comme ERM) Protéine WASp + cdc 42-GTP  stabilisation de la forme ouverte  liaison à ARP   de l’activité de nucléation du complexe ARP Nucléation de l’actine #13p947

163 Dynamique et organisation de l’actine
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Dynamique et organisation de l’actine Activation de cdc 42  Polymérisation de l’actine Formation de faisceaux  Filopodes et spicules Activation de rac  Polymérisation de l’actine à la périphérie de la cellule  Lamellipodes et ondulations Activation de rho  Formation de faisceaux d’actine avec de la myosine II pour former des fibres de stress Formation de contacts focaux par agglomération d’intégrines et protéines associées #13p947

164 Mode d’action de ces 3 « interrupteurs »
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Mode d’action de ces 3 « interrupteurs » Nombreuses protéines cibles en aval  modifications de l’organisation et de la dynamique de l’actine #13p947

165 Etienne-Manneville,S2002p629
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Le cycle de la GTPase Rho Les 3 membres de la famille Rho fonctionnent de façon semblable Activation par GEF (Guanine nucleotide Exchange Factor) (on en connaît plus de 20) Figure 1 The Rho GTPase cycle. Twenty mammalian Rho GTPases have been described: Rho (three isoforms: A, B, C); Rac (1, 2, 3); Cdc42; TC10; TCL; Chp (1, 2); RhoG; Rnd (1, 2, 3); RhoBTB (1, 2); RhoD; Rif; and TTF. They cycle between an active (GTP-bound) and an inactive (GDP-bound) conformation. In the active state, they interact with one of over 60 target proteins (effectors). The cycle is highly regulated by three classes of protein: in mammalian cells, around 60 guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) catalyse nucleotide exchange and mediate activation; more than 70 GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) stimulate GTP hydrolysis, leading to inactivation; and four guanine nucleotide exchange inhibitors (GDIs) extract the inactive GTPase from membranes. All Rho GTPases are prenylated at their C terminus, and this is required for function. Rnd proteins are exceptional in that they do not hydrolyse GTP in vitro, which is an unusual property for a regulatory GTPase. It has been argued that they are controlled by expression, but it is equally possible that a yet to be identified GAP is required for hydrolysis. Figure 1 The Rho GTPase cycle. Twenty mammalian Rho GTPases have been described: Rho (three isoforms: A, B, C); Rac (1, 2, 3); Cdc42; TC10; TCL; Chp (1, 2); RhoG; Rnd (1, 2, 3); RhoBTB (1, 2); RhoD; Rif; and TTF. They cycle between an active (GTP-bound) and an inactive (GDP-bound) conformation. In the active state, they interact with one of over 60 target proteins (effectors). The cycle is highly regulated by three classes of protein: in mammalian cells, around 60 guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) catalyse nucleotide exchange and mediate activation; more than 70 GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) stimulate GTP hydrolysis, leading to inactivation; and four guanine nucleotide exchange inhibitors (GDIs) extract the inactive GTPase from membranes. All Rho GTPases are prenylated at their C terminus, and this is required for function. Rnd proteins are exceptional in that they do not hydrolyse GTP in vitro, which is an unusual property for a regulatory GTPase. It has been argued that they are controlled by expression, but it is equally possible that a yet to be identified GAP is required for hydrolysis. Etienne-Manneville,S2002p629

166 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Effets de Rho, Rac, et Cdc42 sur l'organisation de l'actine dans le fibroblaste (actine colorée à la pholloïdine fluorescente, contacts focaux colorés par AC anti vinculine) Fig16-50 Nombreuses fibres de stress et contacts focaux #13p948 Énorme lamellipode qui fait le tour de la cellule Nombreux filopodes en périphérie actine colorée à la phalloïdine fluorescente, contacts focaux colorés par AC anti-vinculine

167 Alan Hall Rho GTPases and the Actin Cytoskeleton Science, Vol 279, Issue 5350, 23 january 1998, p 509 Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Fig. 1. Rho, Rac, and Cdc42 control the assembly and organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Quiescent, serum-starved Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts (-) contain very few organized actin filaments (A) or vinculincontaining integrin adhesion complexes (B). The effects of Rho, Rac, or Cdc42 activation in these cells can be observed in several different ways such as with the addition of extracellular growth factors, microinjection of activated GTPases, or microinjection of guanosine diphosphate (GDP)–guanosine triphosphate (GTP) exchange factors. Addition of the growth factor lysophosphatidic acid activates Rho, which leads to stress fiber (C) and focal adhesion formation (D). Microinjection of constitutively active Rac induces lamellipodia (E) and associated adhesion complexes (F). Microinjection of FGD1, an exchange factor for Cdc42, leads to formation of filopodia (G) and the associated adhesion complexes (H). Cdc42 activates Rac; hence, filopodia are intimately associated with lamellipodia, as shown in (G). In (A), (C), (E), and (G), actin filaments were visualized with rhodamine phalloidin; in (B), (D), (F ), and (H), the adhesion complexes were visualized with an antibody to vinculin. Scale: 1 cm 5 25 mm. [Figure courtesy of Kate Nobes] Fig. 1. Rho, Rac, and Cdc42 control the assembly and organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Quiescent, serum-starved Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts (-) contain very few organized actin filaments (A) or vinculincontaining integrin adhesion complexes (B). The effects of Rho, Rac, or Cdc42 activation in these cells can be observed in several different ways such as with the addition of extracellular growth factors, microinjection of activated GTPases, or microinjection of guanosine diphosphate (GDP)–guanosine triphosphate (GTP) exchange factors. Addition of the growth factor lysophosphatidic acid activates Rho, which leads to stress fiber (C) and focal adhesion formation (D). Microinjection of constitutively active Rac induces lamellipodia (E) and associated adhesion complexes (F). Microinjection of FGD1, an exchange factor for Cdc42, leads to formation of filopodia (G) and the associated adhesion complexes (H). Cdc42 activates Rac; hence, filopodia are intimately associated with lamellipodia, as shown in (G). In (A), (C), (E), and (G), actin filaments were visualized with rhodamine phalloidin; in (B), (D), (F ), and (H), the adhesion complexes were visualized with an antibody to vinculin. Scale: 1 cm 5 25 mm. [Figure courtesy of Kate Nobes]

168 Alan Hall, Science, Vol 279, Issue 5350, 23 january 1998 p509 Rho GTPases and the Actin Cytoskeleton
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Fig. 4. ERM proteins are required for GTPase-mediated cytoskeletal changes. It has been proposed that ERM proteins exist in a closed (inactive) conformation and an open (active) conformation. There is evidence to suggest that this transition can be regulated by Rho, perhaps through the activation of a Ser-Thr kinase or a lipid kinase (through PIP2). In the active conformation, the NH2-terminus of ERM proteins (pink) can interact with transmembrane proteins, such as CD44, whereas the COOH-terminus (blue) interacts with F-actin. This membrane–ERM–F-actin unit is an essential prerequisite for the Rho GTPases to induce cytoskeletal changes. In the case of Rho, this is likely to be mediated by the bundling and reorganization of preexisting actin-myosin filaments to generate stress fibers, whereas in the case of Rac and Cdc42 it is likely that preexisting filaments are uncapped to allow actin polymerization and filament growth leading to the formation of lamellipodia and filopodia. Fig. 4. ERM proteins are required for GTPase-mediated cytoskeletal changes. It has been proposed that ERM proteins exist in a closed (inactive) conformation and an open (active) conformation. There is evidence to suggest that this transition can be regulated by Rho, perhaps through the activation of a Ser-Thr kinase or a lipid kinase (through PIP2). In the active conformation, the NH2-terminus of ERM proteins (pink) can interact with transmembrane proteins, such as CD44, whereas the COOH-terminus (blue) interacts with F-actin. This membrane–ERM–F-actin unit is an essential prerequisite for the Rho GTPases to induce cytoskeletal changes. In the case of Rho, this is likely to be mediated by the bundling and reorganization of preexisting actin-myosin filaments to generate stress fibers, whereas in the case of Rac and Cdc42 it is likely that preexisting filaments are uncapped to allow actin polymerization and filament growth leading to the formation of lamellipodia and filopodia.

169 Alan Hall, Science, Vol 279, Issue 5350, 23 january 1998 p509 Rho GTPases and the Actin Cytoskeleton
Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Fig. 5. Cdc42p-associated signaling complexes in S. cerevisiae. Cdc42p is essential for both pheromone- induced mating and for nitrogen starvation–induced filamentous growth. In the pheromone response, Bem1p acts a scaffold protein and interacts with Cdc24p (an exchange factor for Cdc42p), Far1p (a cell cycle inhibitor), actin, Ste20p (a Ser-Thr kinase that can interact with Cdc42p), and Ste5p. Ste5p is a scaffold protein that interacts with components of a MAP kinase cascade. Ste20p activates the MAP kinase cascade, but no interaction with Cdc42p is required. A role of Cdc42p is to localize this signaling complex to the mating projection. Cdc42p and Ste20p are also required to activate a distinct MAP kinase pathway (still not completely defined) in response to nitrogen starvation. In this case, the interaction between Cdc42p and Ste20p is essential. Fig. 5. Cdc42p-associated signaling complexes in S. cerevisiae. Cdc42p is essential for both pheromone- induced mating and for nitrogen starvation–induced filamentous growth. In the pheromone response, Bem1p acts a scaffold protein and interacts with Cdc24p (an exchange factor for Cdc42p), Far1p (a cell cycle inhibitor), actin, Ste20p (a Ser-Thr kinase that can interact with Cdc42p), and Ste5p. Ste5p is a scaffold protein that interacts with components of a MAP kinase cascade. Ste20p activates the MAP kinase cascade, but no interaction with Cdc42p is required. A role of Cdc42p is to localize this signaling complex to the mating projection. Cdc42p and Ste20p are also required to activate a distinct MAP kinase pathway (still not completely defined) in response to nitrogen starvation. In this case, the interaction between Cdc42p and Ste20p is essential.


Télécharger ppt "Lundi 22 octobre 2007 Le cytosquelette"

Présentations similaires


Annonces Google