La présentation est en train de télécharger. S'il vous plaît, attendez

La présentation est en train de télécharger. S'il vous plaît, attendez

THEORIE DE LA DETECTION DU SIGNAL La Théorie de la Détection du Signal (TDS) est à la fois un instrument de mesure de la performance et un cadre théorique.

Présentations similaires


Présentation au sujet: "THEORIE DE LA DETECTION DU SIGNAL La Théorie de la Détection du Signal (TDS) est à la fois un instrument de mesure de la performance et un cadre théorique."— Transcription de la présentation:

1 THEORIE DE LA DETECTION DU SIGNAL La Théorie de la Détection du Signal (TDS) est à la fois un instrument de mesure de la performance et un cadre théorique dans lequel cette performance est interprétée du point de vue des mécanismes sous-jacents. En tant que telle, la TDS peut être regardée comme étant à la base de la psychophysique moderne. Le cours développera les bases de la TDS, discutera sa relation avec les concepts de seuil sensoriel et de décision et exemplifiera son application dans des situations expérimentales allant depuis le sensoriel jusqu'au cognitif.

2 S IGNAL D ETECTION T HEORY AND P SYCHOPHYSICS David M. Green & John A. Swets 1 st published in 1966 by Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York Reprint with corrections in 1974 Copyright © 1966 by Wiley & Sons, Inc. Revision Copyright © 1988 by D.M. Green & J. A. Swets 1988 reprint edition published by Peninsula Publishing, Los Altos, CA 94023, USA

3

4

5 CONTINUUM SENSORIEL PROBABABILITÉ 1 FA Hits p(yesN) = p(R N >c) p(yesS) = p(R S >c) p(N) p(S) STIMULUS RÉPONSE BruitSignal Oui FAHit Non CROmiss. c R LE MODEL STANDARD : THEORIE de la DETECTION du SIGNAL CR Miss -

6 Score z Ou « score normal » ou « score standard » Z scores

7 LE MODEL STANDARD : THEORIE de la DETECTION du SIGNAL CONTINUUM SENSORIEL f R : PROBABABILITÉ FA Hits The likelihood ratio Le rapport de vraisemblance c R

8 d=1 c A = c + d/2 = 1.60 = cAcA c = 1.10 c LE MODEL STANDARD : THEORIE de la DETECTION du SIGNAL p(S) =.25 c p N (z=c) p S (z=c) -zFA c0c0 = 1 p(S) =. 50 c = 0

9 TDS – « diagramme détat » DOMAINE DU STIMULUS ETAT INTERNEREPONSE B S R B = « non » R S = « oui » Distracteur (Bruit) Cible (Signal) p2p2 1 - p p 1 u 1 - u 1 « vrais » H p 1 : «vrais» FA p(H) = p 2 + u(1 - p 2 ) p(FA) = p 1 + u(1 – p 1 )

10 Seuil Haut High Threshold Détection du Signal Signal Detection q 1-q Hit u 1-u p(Hit) p(FA) 1-p(FA) 1-p(Hit) q =(H – F) / (1 – F) [correction for guessing] H = p(YesS) = q + u(1 – q) F = p(Yes N) = u INTENSITÉ SEUIL 0 p Intensité RÉPONSE PERFORMANCE

11 z(FA) -z 1 - p >.5 p < p >.5 +z p > p <.5 p > p >.5 +z z(H) -z +z d = z(H) – [-z(FA)] +z d = z(H) – z(FA) dd z(.5) = 0 z(p <.5) < 0 z(p >.5) > 0 z(1 - p) = -z(p)

12

13

14 d computation with Excel d = LOI.NORMALE.STANDARD.INVERSE[p(H)] - LOI.NORMALE.STANDARD.INVERSE[p(FA)] c 0 = -0.5*{LOI.NORMALE.STANDARD.INVERSE[p(H)] + LOI.NORMALE.STANDARD.INVERSE[p(FA)]} c A = -LOI.NORMALE.STANDARD.INVERSE[p(FA)] = LOI.NORMALE(c A ;d;1;FAUX)/LOI.NORMALE(c A ;0;1;FAUX)

15 d d d Receiving Operating Characteristics (ROC)

16 ROC & le Rating experiment 1. Faire le choix entre Oui et Non; 375 Tot N S NonOui 2. Donner son niveau de certitude de 1 (peu sûr) à (par ex.) 3 (très sûr); lon calcule les p pour chaque case en divisant sa fréq. par le no. total 1.00 Tot. N, FA S, H * Non Oui 3. Pr chaque case, lon calcule les p cumulés de gauche à droite, les scores z, les d et c FA H Oui c d zFA zH Sensory Continuum (z) P(z) NS d=.91 c.202-(-.706) =.908 d zH-zFA zFA -.5( ) =.252 c -.5(zH + zFA) 90/375 = /375 =.58 pFAzHpH 2. Calculer le pH, pFA; puis d & c. *Notez que léchelle « Oui/Non » ci-dessus est équivalente à une échelle «Oui» avec 6 graduations, du plus sûr («6») au moins sûr («1»): Tot Oui

17 ROC & le Rating experiment Sensory Continuum (z) ,5 P(z) NS d=.91 Note that a symmetrical ROC indicates that d is independent of c pFA pH

18 ROC & le Rating experiment pFA pH

19 d with unequal variances CONTINUUM SENSORIEL PROBABABILITÉ FA Hits c 1 2

20 pFA pH d ? pH d zFA zH in N units in S units dada dada zH in N units in S units d 2 < d a < d 1 d with unequal variances

21 The index d a has the properties we want. 1.It is intermediate in size between d 1 and d 2. 2.It is equivalent to d' when the ROC slope is 1, for then the perpendicular line of length D Y/N coincides with the minor diagonal, and the two lines of length d a coincide with the d' 1, and d' 2 segments. 3.It turns out to be equivalent to the difference between the means in units of the root-mean- square (rms) standard deviation, a kind of average equal to the square root of the mean of the squares of the standard deviations of S1 and S2. To find d a from an ROC that is linear in z coordinates, it is easiest to first estimate d 1, d 2 and the slope s = d 1 /d 2. Because the standard deviation of the S1 distribution is s times as large as that of S2, we can set the standard deviation of S1 to s and that of S2 to 1. To find d a directly from one point on the ROC once s is known: zFA zH in N units in S units dada dada d with unequal variances

22 Sometimes a measure of performance expressed as a proportion is preferred to one expressed as a distance. The index Az, is such a proportion and is simply D YN transformed by the cumulative normal distribution function, i.e. (D YN ): Az is the area under the normal-model ROC curve, which increases from.5 at zero sensitivity to 1.0 for perfect performance. It is basically equal to %Correct in a 2AFC experiment. It is a truly nonparametric index of sensitivity. d with unequal variances pFA pH d

23 q =(H – F) / (1 – F) H = (1 – q)F + q q 1-q Hit u 1-u pFA pH 1.0 q = 0.6 q = 0.3 q = 0 p(Hit) p(FA) 1-p(FA) 1-p(Hit) pFA pH 1.0

24 High-Threshold Sum Absolute Difference (SAD) Max Absolute Difference (MAD) Schematic of a single trial used for the set size and the target number experiments. In the orientation and spatial frequency experiments, the colored squares were replaced with Gabor patches. Wilken, P. & Ma, W.J (2004). A detection theory account of change detection. J. Vision 4, ROCs obtenus avec une méthode de « rating » sur une échelle de 1 à 4. Different symbols represent performance at different set sizes: set-size 2 for color, orientation and SF – red stars; set-size 4 for color and SF, set-size 3 for orientation – green triangles; set-size 6 for color and SF, set-size 4 for orientation – blue circles; set-size 8 for color and SF, set-size 5 for orientation – purple squares. Hits & FA HT SAD MAD H FA H H

25 LA RELATION ENTRE Y/N & 2AFC See MacMillan & Creelman (2005, 2nd ed.) pp S 12 S0 12 A = « 1 » - « 2 » -S B = « 1 » - « 2 » S

26 LA RELATION ENTRE Y/N & 2AFC d d d 2 Réponse CorrectIncorrectDroite IncorrectCorrectGauche DroiteGauche Stimulus %Correct Hits %Incorrect FA d 2AFC d 2AFC = 2d Oui/Non D 0 G Yes/No See MacMillan & Creelman (2005, 2nd ed.) pp

27 So, objects may be invisible for only reasons; because the internal activity they yield upon presentation: because Sjs report on the presence/absence of the stimulus is solicited within a time delay beyond his/her mnemonic capacity (the case of change blindness). is below Sjs criterion the objet is ignored, or 0 0,1 0,2 0,3 0,4 0, P(z) is undistinguishable from noise (null sensitivity) d' = 0, 0 0,1 0,2 0,3 0,4 0, P(z) d' = 3 c = 1.5 Reasons for invisibility

28 Failure of discriminating Signal from Noise has a triple edge: Stimuli may be out of the standard window of visibility [ ] (Signal Internal noise) e.g. ultraviolet light, SF > 40 c/deg, TF > 50 Hz reduced window of visibility (experimental or pathological – e.g. blindsight) Stimuli may be "masked" by external noise [ ] so that the S/N ratio is decreased by means of: increasing N (external noise impinges on the detecting mechanism the classical pedestal effect, or increases spatial/temporal uncertainty e.g. the "mud-splash effect") decreasing S (external noise activates an inhibitory mechanism lateral masking/metacontrast) [ ] Change of the transducer [ ] (experimentally or neurologically induced gain-control effects, normalization failure …) SENSITIVITY SENSITIVITY

29 can be manipulated in a number of ways: probability pay-off can be affected by experience in general and, possibly, by some neurological conditions blindsight neglect / extinction attentional deficit syndromes CRITERION 50% The response criterion can be assimilated to response bias (and everything that goes with it, i.e. predisposition, context effects, etc.)

30 AN EXAMPLE: CHANGE BLINDNESS Dinner Money Airplane

31 CANAUX, BRUIT et THÉORIE DE LA DÉTECTION DU SIGNAL

32 RV « Qualité » ( ) Intensité Intensité ou « qualité » du Stimulus Réponse (s/s ou autre) Le principe de lUNIVARIANCE

33 « Qualité » ( ) Intensité Intensité ou « qualité » du Stimulus Réponse dun filtre (s/s ou autre) Le principe de lUNIVARIANCE Un « canal » ou « filtre » ou « champ récepteur » Un autre RV I = stimulus intensity R = response R max = max resp. N = max slope S = semi-saturation cst. R s = spontaneous R

34 « Qualité » ( ) Intensité ou « qualité » du Stimulus Réponse dun filtre (s/s ou autre) Le principe de lUNIVARIANCE Un Canal, Filtre. Chp Récep. RV I = stimulus intensity R = response R max = max resp. N = max slope S = semi-saturation cst. R s = spontaneous R Un autre Réponse dun filtre

35 Normalization works (here) by dividing each output by the sum of all outputs. Heeger, D.J. (1992). Normalization of cell responses in cat striate cortex. Visual Neuroscience, 9, RESPONSE NORMALIZATION Divisive inhibition

36 RV RÉPONSE CANAUX & PROBABILITÉ DE RÉPONSE Intensity Discrimination p(s/s) REPONSE (e.g. s/s) p min p Max p min p Max p(s/s)

37 RV RÉPONSE CANAUX & PROBABILITÉ DE RÉPONSE Within & Across Channels Discrimination p(s/s) REPONSE (e.g. s/s) p min p Max p min p Max

38 CANAUX & PROBABILITÉ DE RÉPONSE « OFF-LOOKING » CHANNEL RÉPONSE RV p(s/s) REPONSE (e.g. s/s) p(s/s) REPONSE (e.g. s/s) RV

39 I0I0 I1I1 = cst. log (I) slope = 1 NO Weber s Law I = k k Input R = kI p(R) I I1 R I I0 R TRANSDUCTION

40 I0I0 I1I1 I I1 R I I0 R = cst. p(R) log (I) slope = 1 Weber s Law I = kI TRANSDUCTION

41 I0I0 I1I1 I I0 R p(R) R I I1 log (I) slope > 1 Weber s Law I = kI TRANSDUCTION

42 VISUAL SEARCH and SIGNAL DETECTION THEORY

43

44

45 Temps. Réaction No. Éléments ORIENTATION Parallèle (?!) Temps. Réaction No. Éléments Sériel (?!) ORI + COL Le paradigme type Treisman A.M. & Gelade G. (1980)

46

47 LE MODÉLE STANDARD : LA THÉORIE DE LA DÉTECTION DU SIGNAL « COULEUR » L R V RESPONSE RESPONSE CONTINUUM SENSORIEL (R-V) PROBAB. d nest pas mesurable « COULEUR » L R V RESPONSE CONTINUUM SENSORIEL (R-V) PROBAB. R d=

48 RV RÉPONSE p(s/s) REPONSE (e.g. s/s) p min p Max RV p[R(Y/G) largest] p min x p max CANAUX & PROBABILITÉ DE RÉPONSE LE PLUS RÉPONDANT GAGNE

49 Temps. Réaction No. Éléments ORIENTATION Parallèle (?!) Temps. Réaction No. Éléments Sériel (?!) Procs. Coopératifs Temps. Réaction No. Éléments COULEUR Parallèle (?!) Temps. Réaction No. Éléments Sériel (?!) Procs. Coopératifs

50 Hz cpd Hz cpd NON-CIRCUMSCRIBED FOURIER SPECTRUM LIMITED WINDOW OF VISIBILITY Distributed FOURIER Transform Window of visibility

51 NOISE Noise

52

53 INHIBITORY MASKINGMASKING PROPER NOISE CHANNELS 1212 NOISE Masking

54 STIMULUS INTENSITY INTERNAL RESPONSE or d 1 i j Transducers?

55 A CAT? Identification UN ANIMAL ?


Télécharger ppt "THEORIE DE LA DETECTION DU SIGNAL La Théorie de la Détection du Signal (TDS) est à la fois un instrument de mesure de la performance et un cadre théorique."

Présentations similaires


Annonces Google