La présentation est en train de télécharger. S'il vous plaît, attendez

La présentation est en train de télécharger. S'il vous plaît, attendez

Page 1 Outline I- Introduction II- Definitions III- Common vulnerabilities and threats IV- Authentication V- Access control.

Présentations similaires


Présentation au sujet: "Page 1 Outline I- Introduction II- Definitions III- Common vulnerabilities and threats IV- Authentication V- Access control."— Transcription de la présentation:

1 Page 1 Outline I- Introduction II- Definitions III- Common vulnerabilities and threats IV- Authentication V- Access control

2 Page 2  Concepts for Access Control  Subjects = active entities in the IS  Users, user processes, threads  Objects = passive entities in the IS  Contain information under protection (files, relation in a relational database, directory, memory cell…)  Operations = allow the subject to act on objects  Reading of a file, deletion of a directory, request in a database  A subject has permissions to carry out operations on objects Operation Carries out Acts on V- Access control Definitions SubjectObject

3 Page 3 V- Access control Definitions  Generic access control models [Lampson, 74]  « Reference Monitor » :  Decision procedure that filters the acces request  Enforces an access control policy Operation (acces request) SubjectObject Reference Monitor Access denied Identification/Authentication Authorization

4 Page 4  Mandatory Access Control (MAC)  The system decides to accept or deny an access request to an object, and a subject cannot modify this decision  Based on rules describing the conditions to accept an access request  Example : Multi-level security models V- Access control Access control paradigms Subjects Objects Server 1 “Top Secret” Serveur 3 “Confidential” Server 2 “Secret” Authorized read access Subject 1 “Top Secret” Subject 2 “Top Secret” Subject 3 “Confidential” Subject 4 “Confidential” Rule: a subject can read an object if its security level is greater than the security level of the object Top Secret > Secret > Confidential

5 Page 5 V- Access control Access control paradigms  Discretionary Access Control (DAC)  A subject can decide to accept or deny an access request to an object that he owns  Access permissions are defined, deleted, modified, or handed over at the discretion of the owner of the object  Based on the identity of the subject requesting the access and on access permissions defined on objects  The organization delegate a part of its rights to each user (the way according to which a user delegates his rights may be controlled)  Example : Access control to files and directories in Unix Subjects Objects File 1: owner s1 rwx I --- I --- File 2: owner s2 rw- I rw- I r-- s1 s2 s3 r, w, x r, w r Group 1 Group 2

6 Page 6 V- Access control Access control paradigms  DAC: context of application  Do not satisfy the least privilege principle: a user may give more permissions than necessary  A permission on an object may be handed over without its owner knowing:  A gives a read right on one of its files to B, B copies this file, B being the owner of this copy can hand over his read right to C èA must trust B  Trust is not always enough:  A owns a sensitive file f, B has no permission to read it  B implements a Trojan, and succeeds in persuading A to execute it  When A execute the Trojan, it runs with A’s permissions, and is able to copy f  Not suited to environment dealing with very sensitive information

7 Page 7 V- Access control Access control paradigms  MAC: context of application  Objective:  Control the information flow without trusting the environment  Ensure a partitioning between different kind of information  Principles:  Based on the content of the information, i.e. its sensitivity  A sensitivity level (label) is attached to each object  A subject must obtain a mandate (authorization) to access to a sensitive information  These mandates are distributed by the organization  In practical:  Most widespread model: multi-level security in the military domain  Bell LaPadula model

8 Page 8 V- Access control Access control paradigms  Role Based Access Control (RBAC)  Access to an object is accepted or denied depending on the role of the subject  Example: a role of a subject corresponds to its function in an organization  May be implemented as a set of privilege SubjectsRoles Operations Role 1 Role 2 Role 3 Op 1 Op 3 Op 2

9 Page 9 V- Access control Access operations  Access modes  Observation: examine the content of an object  Alteration: modify the content of an object  Access permission (right, attribute)  Example: permissions in Bell-LaPadula model exec (e) write (w) observe alter x x append (a) x read (r) x

10 Page 10 V- Access control Access operations  Access permission in Multics  Permissions are different depending on the system and on the objects  Access permission in Unix  Access permission in Windows 2000  Full Control, Modify, Read & Execute, Read, and Write + Special permissions File permissionsDirectory permissions read execute read & write write status modify append search Effect on fileEffect on directory r w e list content create or rename a file read write executionsearch

11 Page 11 V- Access control Access control structures  Access control matrix  S set of subjects s, O set of objects o  D set of permissions  M is a matrix whose lines (resp. columns) are indexed with subjects (resp. objects): the cell M[s,o] contains the access permissions of s on o  Example: the modelled system contains  3 processes (s1, s2, and s3), 3 files (o1 et o2, and o3), 3 permissions (r=read, w=write, e=execute) o1o2o3 s1 r,wr,e s2 r,w,e s3 w subjects objects

12 Page 12 V- Access control Access control structures  Other interpretations of Access Control Matrix  Modelling of a programming language  Subjects = procedures/modules  Objects = procedures/variables  Permissions = ability to execute some functions  Modelling of a LAN  Subjets = host stations  Objects = host stations  Permissions = protocols  Other notions of permissions  Evaluation of a boolean expression  Contextual information  Access based on the history of previous access HôtesStation1Station2Station3 Station1ftpftp,mail Station2ftp,nfs Station3mailftpftp,nfs ComptInc_ctrDcr_ctr Inc_ctr+ Dcr_ctr- Managercall

13 Page 13 V- Access control Access control structures  Implement a matrix is costly, in practical:  Use of access control list, or  Use of capacities  Access control list (ACL) : column representation  Each object comes with a list specifying all subjects (or user group) and their permissions  Used in Multics, Windows 2000  To know the permissions of a specific user (in case of a revocation): it is necessary to scan all ACLs s1 r,wo1 s2 r,w,eo2 s3 wo3 s1 r,e

14 Page 14 V- Access control Access control structures  Capacities: line representation  Use of tickets t=(o,P), where o is an object, and P a set of permissions: a subject holding t can access to o with permissions in P  A subject holding a capacity must not be able to modify it, or to build a new capacity  A subject may transfer the capacity to another subject  Used in micro-kernel L4, Capsicum, …  For a specific object it is difficult to know the set of subjects that can access to it  Requires mechanisms to revoke capacities o2 r,w,es2 o3 ws3 o3 r,es1 o1 r,w

15 Page 15 V- Access control Access control structures  Protection bits  Column representation with a structuration into groups  Impossible to specify the access permissions of a particular user  Interdiction (negative permission)  Define which subject cannot access to an object  If added to protections: permits to refine permissions  Protection ring  Each subject and object is associated with a ring number, n°0 corresponds to the strongest protection  Access control is decided according to a comparison of ring numbers of subject and object  Used in Multics, intel80386/80486 processors  Privilege  set of permissions  focuses on the operations (system administrator, …)

16 Page 16 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 2. Contrôle d’accès Contrôle d’accès multi-niveaux  Contrôle d’accès multi-niveaux  Pour certaines politiques de sécurité, il est nécessaire de considérer différents « niveaux » de sécurité  Niveaux de sécurité  Niv ensemble des niveaux : les objets sont classifiés en fonction de leur sensibilité :  Exemples  Niv est complètement ordonné, T>S>C>NC et R>Prop>Sens>Pub Top Secret (T) Secret (S) Confidentiel (C) Non Classifié (NC) Domaine militaire Restreint (R) Propriétaire (Prop) Sensible (Sens) Publique (Pub) Domaine commercial

17 Page 17 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 2. Contrôle d’accès Contrôle d’accès multi-niveaux  Catégories de sécurité  Cat : ensemble des catégories, permet de partitionner les objets de manière non hiérarchique  Principe du besoin d’en savoir (« need to know ») : l’information n’est tranférée qu’aux sujets qui en ont besoin  Exemples  Ensemble non ordonné  Les parties de Cat sont partiellement ordonnées par  Dept. A Dept. B Dept. C Domaine commercial Domaine militaire US EUR ASIE

18 Page 18 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 2. Contrôle d’accès Contrôle d’accès multi-niveaux  Labels de sécurité  L’ensemble des labels de sécurité : LS=Niv  P(Cat) Exemple de label : (T,{US,EUR})  Relation d’ordre partielle induite : dom (« domine ») (niv1,ens_cat1) dom (niv2,ens_cat2) ssi niv1  niv2 et ens_cat2  ens_cat1 Exemple : (T,{US,EUR}) dom (S,{US})  (LS,dom) est un treillis (dom est une relation d’ordre partielle et il existe une borne inf et une borne sup pour chaque couple (l1,l2) de LS)  Exercice : construire le treillis pour Niv={C,S} et Cat={US,EUR}

19 Page 19 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 2. Contrôle d’accès Contrôle d’accès multi-niveaux (C,  ) (C,{US})(C,{EUR}) (S,  ) (S,{US}) (S,{EUR}) (C,{US,EUR}) (S,{US,EUR})  Treillis des labels de sécurité Exemple : Niv={C,S}, Cat={US,EUR}

20 Page 20 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 2. Contrôle d’accès Contrôle d’accès multi-niveaux  Habilitation : label de sécurité associé à un sujet  Classification : label de sécurité associé à un objet  Les sujets sont habilités à un niveau de sécurité pour un ensemble de catégories donné  Les sujets sont classifiés selon un niveau de sécurité et un ensemble de catégories donné  Sécurité multi-niveaux : permet de définir des politiques MAC en compartimentant l’information.

21 Page 21 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 2. Contrôle d’accès Contrôle d’accès multi-niveaux  Implémentation des labels dans Unix System V/MLS  Nombre fixe de labels de sécurité et ensemble fixe de catégories  Administration des labels, catégories et labels par l’administrateur système  Sujets = processus UNIX, objets= fichiers et répertoires UNIX  Implémentation des labels : initialement utilisation de bits de l’identifiant de groupe, GID, codé sur 16 bits (versions suivantes : GID pointeur vers une structure contenant notamment les labels, insertion des labels dans les structures de nœuds d’indexes ou i-node)  Chaque utilisateur a un label défini au login, les processus associés héritant de ce label. Une commande permet à l’utilisateur de changer explicitement son label  Labels flottants : plage de label Label de sécuritéCatégories de sécuritéGID Bits Label de sécurité

22 Page 22 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 2. Contrôle d’accès Contrôle d’accès multi-niveaux  Multi-niveaux sans distinction niveaux/catégories  Exemple : labels pour un firewall  Séparation stricte entre « l’intérieur » et « l’extérieur » d’un réseau Privé InterneExterne Publique

23 Page 23 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 3. Modèles de contrôle d’accès Modèle de Bell LaPadula  Historique  BLP : modèle basé sur une machine à état conçu au MITRE [BLP73]  Sous contrat avec l’ « Air Force »  Dans le cadre du développement de l’OS Multics  Un des modèles de sécurité les plus influents depuis 30 ans  La politique du modèle BLP avait été intégrée dans les critères TSECs  Caractéristiques  Capture les aspects confidentialité du contrôle d’accès  Modèle multi-niveaux : l’information ne peut circuler d’un niveau donné à un niveau inférieur  BLP et Matrice de contrôle d’accès :  BLP utilise une matrice de contrôle d’accès pour décrire les contrôles d’accès discrétionnaires.

24 Page 24 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 3. Modèles de contrôle d’accès Modèle de Bell LaPadula  Principe : Modèle = machine à états  éléments de base (sujets, objets, permissions, labels de sécurité)  état composé :  d’une matrice des permissions d’accès  d’un ensemble des accès en cours  d’un ensemble d’affectations de labels de sécurité pour chaque sujet et objet (calculées avec les fonctions de niveaux détaillées dans la suite)  la sécurité est définie par un ensemble de propriétés sur les états: SS-property + *-property + ds-property (+ tranquility)  ensemble de règles : règles de transition sur les états

25 Page 25 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 3. Modèles de contrôle d’accès Modèle de Bell LaPadula  Model elements:  Set of subjects S, set of objects O  Set of permission P  Observation without altération : read (r)  Observation and alteration : write (w)  Alteration without observation : append (a)  No observation, no altération : execute (e)  An access control matrix built from S, O and P  Set of labels L with a partial order dom

26 Page 26 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 3. Modèles de contrôle d’accès Modèle de Bell LaPadula  Model elements  Label function l  l : S U O  L, assigns a label to each subject and object  F, set of couples (s,l(s)) and (o,l(o)) for every subject s and object o  Set of current access, CA whose elements are triplets  (s,o,p) with s a subject, o an object and p a permission  States of the model : CA  M  F  A state of the model is described by the set of current access, an access control matrix and the assignment of labels to subject and object

27 Page 27 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 3. Modèles de contrôle d’accès Modèle de Bell LaPadula  MAC policy in BLP  Simple security property (ss): a state of the model satisfies the property (ss) if for every current access (s,o,p) in AC with p  {r,w} (observation) then l(s) dom l(o) è no read-up  A Trojan may still be able to copy the content of a sensitive file in a file with a lower label that a malicious user with a lower label can read it  Hence the following property  *-property (star-property, confinement property): a state of the model satisfies the *-property, if for every current access (s,o,p) in AC with p  {w,a} (alteration) then l(o) dom l(s) è no write down

28 Page 28 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 3. Modèles de contrôle d’accès Modèle de Bell LaPadula  BLP MAC policy Label L1 (L1 dom L2) Label L2 O2O2 O1O1 S1S1 S2S2 obs alt obsalt obs,alt O3O3 Label L3 (L3 non comparable with L1 nor L2) obs,alt S3S3 No direct information flow from a higher object (o1) to a lower object (o2)!

29 Page 29 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 3. Modèles de contrôle d’accès Modèle de Bell LaPadula  BLP DAC policy The third proprerty deals with discretionary access  ds-property: a state of the model satisfies the property (ds) if for every current access (s,o,p) in AC, p appears in the cell [s,o] of access control matrix M.  Basic security theorem  A state is secure if properties (ss), (*), and (ds) are satistfied.  A transition from a state e1 to e2 is secure if e1 and e2 are secure  Theorem: if the initial state of a system is secure, and if each of its transitions is also secure, then all reachable state is secure.  Proof: induction on the sequence of transition  Independent from BLP properties

30 Page 30 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 3. Modèles de contrôle d’accès Modèle de Bell LaPadula  Un sujet s1 de label l1 ne peut pas envoyer de message à un sujet s2 de label l2 inférieur à l1 !  Solution : on distingue deux habilitations pour les sujets  f m : S  LS, détermine l’ « habilitation maximale » d’un sujet  f c : S  LS, détermine l’« habilitation courante » d’un sujet (f c (s)  f m (s))  Deux interprétations  on diminue temporairement le label de s1  on considère que les connaissances d’un sujet se limitent à l’état courant  si le sujet est un processus (sans mémoire), il ne peut accéder à un niveau supérieur  on identifie un sous-ensemble de sujets de confiance de S qui peuvent violer la propriété *  cette approche est plus adaptée si les sujets sont des personnes physiques (avec une mémoire)  un sujet de confiance s peut se connecter avec une habilitation f c (s)

31 Page 31 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 3. Modèles de contrôle d’accès Modèle de Bell LaPadula  BLP initialement conçu pour des transitions ne modifiant pas les labels de sécurité  Une transition diminuant le label de sécurité d’un objet viole la propriété de confinement (propriété *) -> pb de la déclassification : définir un ensemble d’entité de confiance qui suppriment les informations sensibles avant de déclassifier  Propriété de tranquillité forte : les labels de sécurité ne changent pas  Autre possibilité : les labels de sécurité ne peuvent être diminués

32 Page 32 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 3. Modèles de contrôle d’accès Modèle de Bell LaPadula  BLP a joué un rôle important dans la conception d’OS sécurisés  Used in Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux), set of Kernel modifications and user-space tools that can be added to various Linux distributions  Limitations  Ne traite pas d’intégrité (choix)  Modèle rigide  L’organisation garde une forte emprise sur le contrôle et la distribution de l’information  Beaucoup d’opérations sûres ne sont pas permises  Reste vulnérable aux canaux cachés  Covert channel: information flow that is not controlled by any security mechanism  Canal de stockage / canal temporel  Exple : noms d’objets, attaque par DPA (differential power analysis)

33 Page 33 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 3. Modèles de contrôle d’accès Modèle de Bell LaPadula  Covert channel in BLP  Subject s2 wants to read the content of object o1 such that l(o1) dom l(s2)  Assume that s2 succeeded in installing a Trojan s1 with label l(s1)=l(o1), with s1 and s2 synchronized  Direct access forbidden in BLP  For each bit of o1  Trojan s1 reads the bit, and if bit=0, S1 does nothing, otherwise S1 creates a special file “Bit” with label l(s1)  Subject s2 tries to read the file Bit ; if s2 receives a message “no such file” s2 records 0, otherwise s2 receives a message “access forbidden” and records 1  s1 et s2 iterate n times  s1 can send to s2, n bits of information contained in o1  Informing a subject that an operation is forbidden is an information flow!

34 Page 34 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 3. Modèles de contrôle d’accès Modèle de Biba  Modèle de Biba (1977)  Modèle multi-niveaux pour l’intégrité : éviter la contamination d’entités « saines » d’un niveau donné, par des entités « corrompues » de niveaux inférieurs  L’information ne peut s’écouler que du haut vers le bas  Treillis de labels d’intégrité (NI, domine)  f s et f o assignent les labels d’intégrité resp. à un sujet et à un objet  Les droits d’accès sont : read, write et execute  Notion de confiance implicite  Plus haut est le label d’intégrité d’un sujet, plus on accorde de la confiance dans le bon déroulement de son exécution  Un objet avec un label d’intégrité donné est plus fiable qu’un objet avec un label inférieur

35 Page 35 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 3. Modèles de contrôle d’accès Modèle de Biba  Plusieurs politiques  Politique d’intégrité stricte (duale de BLP) : labels statiques  Propriété d’intégrité simple : un sujet s peut modifier un objet o ssi f s (s) domine f o (o)  Propriété d’intégrité * : un sujet s peut observer un objet o ssi f o (o) domine f s (s) Formulation alternative de la propriété d’intégrité *  Propriété d’intégrité * (faible): un sujet s peut observer un objet o ssi pour tout objet o’ qu’il est en train modifier f o (o) domine f o (o’)  Politique « Ligne de flottaison basse » : labels dynamiques  Propriété Low watermark object : si un sujet s modifie un objet o alors le label d’intégrité de o devient inf(f s (s),f o (o))  Propriété Low watermark subject : si un sujet observe un objet o alors le label d’intégrité de s devient inf(f s (s),f o (o))

36 Page 36 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 3. Modèles de contrôle d’accès Modèle de Biba  Chemin de transfert d’information : séquence d’objets o 1, …, o n+1, et de sujets s 1, …, s n, tels que s i r o i et s i w o i+1 (1≤i≤n)  Succession de read et de write permettant de transférer une donnée d’un objet o 1 dans un objet o n+1  Théorème : s’il existe un chemin de transfert d’information entre des objets o 1 et o n+1, alors les deux politiques précédentes garantissent que f(o 1 ) domine f(o n+1 ) (pour n > 1).

37 Page 37 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 3. Modèles de contrôle d’accès Modèle de Biba  Propriété d’invocation : opération entre sujets  un sujet s peut exécuter un sujet s’ ssi f s (s) domine f s (s’) Ajoutée aux 2 premières politiques d’intégrité : un sujet contaminé ne peut accèder indirectement à un objet sain en invoquant un sujet sain  Politique « en anneau » :  Propriété simple : un sujet s peut écrire dans un objet o ssi f s (s) domine f o (o)  Propriété * : tout sujet s peut lire tout objet, indépendamment des labels d’intégrité  Propriété d’invocation : un sujet s exécuter un sujet s’, ssi f s (s’) domine f o (s) Inverse de la propriété d’invocation : le sujet invoqué devra effectuer des vérifications de consistence afin de s’assurer qu’il reste sain  exemples : LOMAC dans Free Bsd (module implémentant la politique « Ligne de flottaison basse »)

38 Page 38 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 3. Modèles de contrôle d’accès RBAC  Principe  Se base sur le fait que les utilisateurs jouent un rôle précis dans l’organisation dont on peut déduire les permissions (privilèges)  Permet de représenter la structure d’une organisation sous-forme hiérarchique  Modèle RBAC = Role-Based Access Control  Premiers travaux : NIST, 1992  Modèle de base : RBAC96  Modèle d’administration des rôles : ARBAC97

39 Page 39 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 3. Modèles de contrôle d’accès RBAC  Eléments du modèle  U : ens. d’utilisateurs  R : rôles (fonctionnel, organisationnel, event participation à un projet)  P : permissions  S : sessions (les utilisateurs doivent toujours commencer par activer une session), activée par un seul utilisateur, qui peut activer plusieurs rôles  AU : affectation des utilisateurs aux rôles (relation plusieurs-à- plusieurs)  AP : affection des permissions aux rôles (relation plusieurs-à-plusieurs)

40 Page 40 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 3. Modèles de contrôle d’accès RBAC Permissions UsersRôlesOpérationsObjets Sessions User Sessions (un à plusieurs) AS (plusieurs à plusieurs) AUAP

41 Page 41 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 3. Modèles de contrôle d’accès RBAC  Hiérarchie de rôles  Calquée sur la hiérarchie de l’organisation  Héritage des permissions d’un rôle vers les rôles séniors  écriture rapide de la politique de contrôle d’accès  Plusieurs interprétations :  spécialisation/généralisation : Ingénieur-> Ingénieur qualité ou Ingénieur production  hiérarchie organisationnelle : Directeur, Chef de projet, Ingénieur  hiérarchie fonctionnelle : Ingénieur, ingénieur Devlpt, Employé

42 Page 42 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 3. Modèles de contrôle d’accès RBAC Personnel Personnel enseignantPersonnel administratifPersonnel recherche Secrétaire Chargé d’enseignement Ingénieur de recherche Maître de conférences Professeur Chef de département

43 Page 43 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 3. Modèles de contrôle d’accès RBAC  Contraintes  Ajout de contraintes (expressions logiques) sur les affectations  Contraintes sur AU (utilisateurs rôles)  Un utilisateur ne peut cumuler certains rôles (séparation des fonctions ou des pouvoirs)  Contraintes de cardinalité  Contraintes sur AP (rôles permissions)  Certaines permissions ne peuvent être affectées à certains rôles (interdictions)  Certaines permissions ne peuvent être affectées à plusieurs rôles  Un rôle ne peut pas cumuler certaines permissions (séparation des tâches)  Contraintes sur AS (sessions rôles)  Contraintes sur l’activation des roles  Contraintes sur la hiérarchie de rôle

44 Page 44 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 3. Modèles de contrôle d’accès RBAC  ARBAC = administrative RBAC  Définit les règles et mécanismes pour gérer RBAC  Auto-administration  Une autorité centrale définit  la hiérarchie de rôles,  les permissions associées aux rôles  les contraintes  L’affectation des utilisateurs aux rôles est décentralisée  On ajoute  RA : rôles administratifs, RA  R=   PA : permissions administratives, PA  P=   Administration de l’affection des rôles aux utilisateurs, et des permissions aux rôles

45 Page 45 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 3. Modèles de contrôle d’accès RBAC  On peut simuler les modèles DAC et MAC dans RBAC  Gestion des autorisations souple :  Assignement des rôles aux utilisateurs  Assignement des autorisations d’accès aux objets, aux rôles  Principe du moins privilège  Séparation des fonctions et des tâches  Modélisation partielle de l’organisation  Les rôles restent internes à une organisation  Aucun mécanisme de délégation

46 Page 46 IV- Fonctions de sécurité 3. Modèles de contrôle d’accès Conclusion  Autres modèles :  modèles pour les politiques de sécurité dans le monde médical  modèles pour la disponibilité  Aucun modèle unique permettant d’exprimer toutes les exigences que peut contenir une politique de sécurité  Modélisation de l’organisation  Structuration des utilisateurs  Séparation des tâches et des fonctions  Délégation et transfert de droits  Administration de la politique de sécurité  …  Besoin de nouveaux modèles de sécurité plus « dynamiques » :  configurables et personnalisables suivant des profils d’utilisateurs, des flux  dépendant du contexte, de la localisation, …  Contrôle d’usage (UCON) : obligations


Télécharger ppt "Page 1 Outline I- Introduction II- Definitions III- Common vulnerabilities and threats IV- Authentication V- Access control."

Présentations similaires


Annonces Google